A Promise Kept by Robin Lee Hatcher {Book Review}

A Promise Kept by Robin Lee Hatcher My rating: 5 of 5 stars Set in two different time frames, but with the common bridge of doubt, pain, finding strength and rediscovering God, “A Promise Kept” by Robin Lee Hatcher was an eloquently written story about two different women in different times, yet facing similar issues…



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Sunflower Faith

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Tuesday Top Ten: Most Registered Dog Breeds in the US, 2013 Edition

The American Kennel Club has announced their list of breed registrations from 2013. Although many owners don’t choose to register their dogs, the number of registrations received for each breed is considered an indication of the popularity of the breed. Of course, there are undoubtedly many more mutt-i-grees than purebred dogs in the world, but […]


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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PKK 14 Eylül Lice Karakol Eyleminde 25 askerin öldürüldüğü Görüntüleri yayinladi

HPG gerillalarının 14 Eylül’de Diyarbakır’ın Lice ilçesine bağlı Tepe jandarma karakoluna yönelik düzenlediği eylemin görüntüleri Gerilla TV’de yayınlandı. H…
Video Rating: 2 / 5

Bahtiyar Aydın’ı kim şehid etti?
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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We Will Remember You: A Pet Loss Memorial Candle Ceremony

There is something vastly powerful about going through grief with friends. It validates, it resonates, it comforts. When it comes to losing a pet, too many of us are forced to endure the pain without that camaraderie of a circle of friends.

To that end, and because I know so many people continue to hurt and feel alone in their grief over the loss of a beloved pet, The Tiniest Tiger and I are hosting a Pet Loss Candle Ceremony next Wednesday, February 5th, at 6 pm PST.

remember

What Will Happen

During this Google Hangout, we will be lighting candles to remember those who have left us, and to comfort those left behind. It’s open to all- kids can participate too!

 

How To Participate

1. Watch at home: at Google +, YouTube, or here.

The main Google + Event page is here. You do not need to RSVP to watch it, but if you do you will be sent a reminder through your Google account.

You can also watch at light your own candle at home without a Google + account. It will stream live, and also be up later as a recorded event, on YouTube. All you need to do is click on this link at the time of the hangout, or simply come back here and watch it here on this post.

Date: Wednesday, February 5th

Time: 6 pm PST (Click here to convert to your time zone.)

2. Watch and Chat

If you’d like to type in a question or memory during the Hangout, you’ll need a Google + account at plus.google.com.

3. Be an Online Candle Lighter

If you would like to be online with us as a candle lighter, we will have a limited number of spaces. You will need a Google + account as well as a webcam- and a candle :) . If you’d like to be a part of that, please contact me here or through my Contact Page and I can give you more information.

We are very excited to be doing this event as so many of us have known this sadness recently- or even not so recently. We hope you can join us!

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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What Can Mayor Bloomberg Teach You About Dog Training?

Bloomberg-Logo-650x400 (This is not a political blog. Please bear with me for a few paragraphs. It will get to dog training, I promise. Also please note I am drawing parallells not commenting on policy. This is a dog training blog, not a blog about politics, (human) education, or race relations. Save it for Facebook!)

The news in New York City has been dominated the past few weeks with the mayoral race. (Now that the primaries are over, we’ve got a brief respite, but it’s sure to heat up again in October.) It’s been an entertaining season, partially because more than one of the candidates are more sideshow than serious politician and partly because of the spectacle of candidates trying to figure out how to walk the line on Bloomberg policies that seem both effective and morally and/or ethically compromised.

Like all New York City Mayors, Michael Bloomberg has been a polarizing figure. I have found some of the controversies particularly interesting because he comes from the same corporate and technological culture I do, and this often seems to drive his policy decisions.

On Wall Street (as well as technology companies like Google and Apple) data is king. Business decisions are made based on measurable results. This is often an effective strategy, especially when you are in the business of selling data (which is how Bloomberg became a millionaire) or selling widgets. What can be more effective than measuring results and then adjusting tactics based on them?

But this very practice is what has gotten Bloomberg in trouble more than once. The two examples that come immediately to mind are his school testing policies and the New York Police Department’s infamous “stop and frisk” practices, which Bloomberg has staunchly defended.

In the case of school testing Bloomberg is following the national trend of administering copious amount of standardized tests in order to measure school results. From a data-driven perspective this makes perfect sense. However educators and parents insist that is leads to “teaching to the test” and unnecessary stress for the children.

In the case of “stop and frisk” data analysis led to Ray Kelly’s ill-advised statement about how “African-Americans are being under-stopped.” Here again numbers and measurable results, examined in a vacuum, led to Kelly’s assertion. The broader picture however, might lead some to disagree. (The more I read Kelly’s and Bloomberg’s defense of stop and frisk, the more I think of the engineer and the balloon.)

So what does all this have to do with dog training?

In the ABCs I spend a lot of digital ink laying out a formula for problem solving. It’s an approach to solving behavior problems that anyone from Bloomberg’s world would embrace. And we can learn a few things from Bloomberg’s successes and failures that apply to using the ABCs too.

Before you can solve a problem you need to define it. This may seem obvious, but it’s not.

What do you think is the problem with education? Basic skills, dropout rates, or college admissions? Which one you pick will have a tremendous impact on your approach.

What do you think is the underlying cause of crime? Poverty? Recidivism? Illegal weapons? Drug use? Again, how you define the problem will have a tremendous impact on your solutions.

In the animal behavior training world the obstacle to defining the problem is often one of using labels and classifications over behaviors. Is “my dog is jealous” a problem? How about “my dog is dominant” or even “my dog is fearful?” Is your definition of “fearful” the same as mine? Roger Abrantes has written about the issues behind defining what dominance really is and for many, including myself, he highlights a conflict that has made the word at least temporarily useless.

Properly defining problems is critical to the solving it because if you can’t measure it you can’t say you solved it. Can you measure dominance? Or jealousy? Or fear? No, you can’t. You can measure barking, lunging, growling, pulling on leash, and fleeing. These things might be part of a “package” we call jealousy, dominance, or fearfulness, but we need to agree on the actual measurable actions first and chances if we do that well the labels are unnecessary.

With Bloomberg & Co. the case could be made that part of their problem is a lack of agreement on the defining the issues and the desired results. “Better schools” is something everyone can agree on…until it’s time to agree on what a better school actually is and then take steps to achieve it.

Similarly “less crime” wins elections, but if your tactics land you in trouble with the public, press, and even the courts, than there is an obvious disconnect between you and the people. The NYPD and the City Administration are measuring a result that does not seem important enough to others given what (they claim) it took to get that result.

I wrote earlier about defining what you want instead of what you don’t want. A critical part of that definition is making sure that what you want is specific and measurable. I’ll be writing more about this in the next few weeks.

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What Can Mayor Bloomberg Teach You About Dog Training? is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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Nice Flea photos

A few nice Flea images I found:

Flea Market Flutist
Flea

Image by muckster
This girl was making good money busking at the flea market.

Flea Market statues
Flea

Image by MShades
Some little statues for sale at the Kitano Tenmangu flea market.

Brooklyn Flea
Flea

Image by Atomische * Tom Giebel
Brooklyn Flea

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You’ll Get Through This: Hope and Help for Your Turbulent Times by Max Lucado {Book Review}

You’ll Get Through This: Hope and Help for Your Turbulent Times by Max Lucado My rating: 5 of 5 stars I try to imagine the thoughts Joseph must have had when his day went from….perfectly ordinary to finding his world completely turned upside down by the very people he not only grew up with, but…



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Sunflower Faith

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Possibly the worst dog commercial–ever

Car maker Audi has spent millions filming this commercial with the teaser ads to run during the Super Bowl. It features a man and woman in a pet store. He is taken with the Chihuahua and she loves the Doberman. So the sleazy sales guy suggests a compromise, breeding them together, the Doberhuahua. What follows in their minds in supposed to be funny but the humor eludes me. The Doberhuahua is not only a grotesque…
The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Meloetta Mite Mite ☆ Kochichi

Spero vi piaccia ;) Tra pochi giorni metterò il video in cui “io” stessa ballerò Mite Mite Kochichi *-* (e spero di andare bene e di non fare figure come al …
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Which Dog Breeds Make the Smartest Dogs?

You may have heard the recent VetStreet.com survey of the five smartest dog breeds. The top five breeds, according to veterinarians, are:

  1. Border Collie
  2. German Shepherd
  3. Poodle
  4. Australian Shepherd
  5. Golden Retriever

Given that my dog is an Australian Shepherd/Border Collie mix, according to this survey I may be living with the canine equivalent of a brain surgeon. My dog may in fact be smarter than your honor student.

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It’s hard to top Chaser, the dog who knows more than 1,000 words. Image: Facebook

And Sasha is smart -- don’t get me wrong. But she’s not the caliber of Chaser, the Border Collie who knows the names of more than 1,000 objects. (He even has his own Wikipedia page.) And, she’s certainly not as smart as Lucy, the shrewd Beagle who knows how to get chicken nuggets out of a toaster oven. So why isn’t she as clever, given her “pedigree”?

Dr. Stanley Coren, author of The Intelligence of Dogs, uses trainability as a marker of intelligence, and he agrees with most of the veterinarians’ top five choices, but he substitutes the Doberman Pinscher for the Australian Shepherd. (Another ding for my dog, Sasha.) Rounding out his top 10 most intelligent breeds are: Shetland Sheepdogs, Labrador Retrievers, Papillons, Rottweilers and Australian Cattle Dogs.

However, Dr. Brian Hare, author of The Genius of Dogs, has a differing theory on what makes some dogs smarter than others. Hare’s philosophy is that intelligence is not tied to breed. Hare says there is no scientific research on breed differences in relation to intelligence, and favors instead the “unique intelligence” of each individual dog. Hare says that some dogs are able to follow social cues and some dogs are better at making inferences, while others excel at understanding gestures or navigating.

I think I know what he means. I know that Sasha is not very adept at understanding gestures. When I ask her, “Where’s your ball?” and point in a certain direction, she looks frustrated and jumps at my hand, instead of looking toward the direction I’m pointing. But she is pretty good at understanding words, and we’ve even resorted to spelling certain trigger words (t-r-e-a-t) instead of saying them.

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Here's Sasha trying her hand at a crossword puzzle.

So where else does Sasha shine? Well, she’s really good at waking me and my husband up every morning promptly at 7 am. We no longer even need to set an alarm clock. And she’s also efficient at telling us when it’s time to go to bed (are you getting the picture that our dog runs the household yet?). She’s very effective at communicating to me when she’s hungry, and she can go and fetch the newspaper (as long as there’s not a squirrel in the vicinity). And, as far as her ultimate ability, Sasha excels at catching things. She can easily catch balls and Frisbees in midair. 

And I’m not sure I’d want to have a dog who’s smarter than me, anyway! Hare says in The Genius of Dogs that he would like to see dog parents at the dog park trade information about their dog’s unique talents instead of talking about how smart breeds are.

So how about it? What are your dog’s unique talents? Tell me in comments!

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The Scoop | The Scoop

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