Latest Flea News

A Guide To The Best Flea Markets In The World (PHOTOS)
I have always subscribed to the idea that a house needs old things, pieces with history that bring soul. A home should be curated and flea markets are great places to find soulful pieces and treasured accents: usually with hundreds, if not thousands
Read more on Huffington Post

Fleas Close Learning Center
"That would've been a little different if he would've came home with flea bites or if there would've been stuff on his clothes or in his backpack. I wouldn't have been as understanding." Fleas are parasites, but with nothing to live on for several days
Read more on Tristatehomepage.com

Dog flea meds a danger to cats
When the owners spotted fleas on their two cats, they put “just a drop” of topical flea treatment on each one. Within hours the cats were very sick, and one of them was convulsing. The family rushed them to the nearest veterinary clinic, but both cats
Read more on ReporterNews.com

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Three things to know about the jerky illnesses

Let’s imagine, for a moment, that there is a serial killer loose in your town. One by one, he picks little kids off from the local playground, and it’s horrible and awful. The police are working around the clock, but the killer remains elusive.

But he only ever chooses his victims from that one playground.

You wouldn’t take your kids there, right? Even if *most* of the kids who play there end up ok, even if the police chief says, well, it might be OK now? Why take that chance, when there are plenty of safe alternatives?

That’s kind of how I feel about this jerky thing. From the latest FDA update:

The agency has repeatedly issued alerts to consumers about reports it has received concerning jerky pet treat-related illnesses involving 3,600 dogs and 10 cats in the U.S. since 2007. Approximately 580 of those pets have died.

Since 2007, guys. Keep in mind that the FDA is usually all over dog foods when there is potential human illness involved as well, but the wheels turn a little more slowly when there is no indication people are also getting sick. Regardless, I’m glad they are becoming involved- and the level in which they are asking for veterinarians and consumers to participate is much higher than I’ve seen before- but there’s no indication when we might have some answers.

jerky

There’s really only three things I’m reminding people of here:

1. It’s not just chicken

Everyone keeps focusing on chicken jerky as the culprit, but some sickened dogs have eaten duck, fruit, or sweet potato jerkies as well. Most of the treats have come from China (they aren’t saying it outright in the fact sheet, but we can read between the lines here.)

2. The symptoms are diffuse

Not every dog has the same symptoms. Some have GI signs, some have liver issues, others have renal disease. There may be one cause but it is possible we are dealing with multiple contaminants, drugs, or toxins. Which is really frightening.

3. This is 100% entirely preventable

Now that we know it’s a problem, there’s an easy solution. Don’t feed jerky treats from China. They are not a necessary part of anyone’s daily nutrition. It won’t find the culprit, but it will keep your pet safe until they do. Here are some alternatives:

  • Make your own. No special equipment required.
  • Use fresh alternatives like baby carrots or apples
  • Become obsessive about label-reading. Even some products that appear to be from the US or distributed from the US have ingredients made in China. If you’re not sure, don’t buy it.

I made this video almost two years ago, and we STILL don’t know what is going on with those jerky treats.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Do you know anyone whose pet was sickened from jerky?

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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Diet Can Help With Chronic Health Problems of Pets

 I have found that simple changes to the commercial diet may make all the difference is the world! A lab with chronic ear problems, a German Shepherd with chronic diarrhea, or a bulldog with skin issues may get better when fed a hypoallergenic diet( the best is salmon/potato)

However the best diet can be ruined by biscuits, treats, and chews that cause SO many problems!

Adding healthy oils to the diet can help the skin and coat! (olive, fish, coconut, canola)

Feeding sardines, herring, and eggs several times a week makes the body and coat happy!

Feeding baby carrots instead of biscuits and canned food instead of dry can help pets lose weight!

Feed raw meaty bones or raw chicken wings or thighs for healthier teeth and joints!

That’s what I talk about in “Dog Dish Diet” Ingredients, allergies, and easy home cooking. This info has saved clients and readers  hundreds and  thousands of dollars in vet bills!

Many clients like the idea of cooking wholesome healthy ingredients, so I also wrote about easy, economical slow cooking dog and cat food in “Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet”

 Many vets believe that changing to a prescription diet will cure  health problems. Some believe food allergies and intolerance of ingredients are not the cause of many medical problems. I used to believe that way until learning about how simple changes to the commercial diet, adding healthy oils, avoiding allergenic treats and chews  may such a big difference! Some day vets will be taught in school how to harness the power of nutrition!( people doctors too!)

Many clients come in to thank me every week for saving them money and giving them a healthier pet!

click for healthier pet!

 

Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

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Cool Pest images

A few nice Pest images I found:

2010 DoD Pest Management Workshop February 2010 (14)
Pest

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
Picture from the DoD Pest Management Workshop held in Jacksonville, FL.

2010 DoD Pest Management Workshop February 2010 (91)
Pest

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
Picture from the DoD Pest Management Workshop held in Jacksonville, FL.

2010 DoD Pest Management Workshop February 2010 (97)
Pest

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
Picture from the DoD Pest Management Workshop held in Jacksonville, FL.

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Dog Provides Finishing Touch To Half-Time Show

True American Dog

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Training Your Dog

No dog is born with good manners, nor are humans. When training your dog the most important thing you need to teach it is to let you know when it has to go to the bathroom.

Are you tired of your new puppy pooping on your carpet, leaping up on the laps of your guests, pulling so hard on its leash that you feel your arm is going to be pulled out of the socket? This is not fun, but it is SOP (standard operating procedure) for a dog. If you want your pet to act civilly when guests are around and not create chaos in your life at other times, you’ll need to train your puppy or adult dog if you expect it to be pleasant to live with.

Not training your dog has about the same results as never sending your child to school and expecting him to graduate from college summa cum laude.

Training is the best gift you can ever give your puppy or young adult dog. It’s a great way to develop a lifetime bond with your dog. Friendly, house trained, well-behaved dogs make better companions and are less likely to end up in an animal shelter when an owner can no longer handle its antics and bad behavior.

We all remember the old saying “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks”. This is nothing more than an old aphorism passed down through generations. More often than not, it is actually referring to humans and their stubbornness in learning something new or changing their ways. In actuality, there are no age limits to teaching dogs. Puppies as young as three weeks old can learn correct behavior and so can adult dogs of any age.

But here’s the most critical part of training – the buck starts with you!

When training your dog it doesn’t matter whether you have a new puppy or a senior dog; the first step is learning how to be a good teacher to your dog.

    Guidelines for dog training

No matter what you’re trying to teach your dog, whether it’s house training or commands like “sit” or “stay”, there are a few basic guidelines that will help make the whole teaching and learning process easier for both you and your pet.

Be consistent
Always use the same signal and tone of voice for a command when training your dog. If you say “come” one day, then “come here” another day, and “come here, now” a different day, you’ll do nothing but confuse your dog. If you allow your dog to yank on its leash sometimes, but you jerk it by the collar when it pulls you other times, you’ll also confuse it. It’s important that everyone who will be issuing commands to your dog uses the same rules and signals.

Use praise and rewards
Almost all dog trainers believe that dogs learn better and faster when they are praised and rewarded for getting it right, instead of punishing them when they get it wrong.

The best motivator is usually a combination of a small food treat and enthusiastic praise. Too many people forego the doggy treat because they worry they’ll end up with a dog who’ll only behave when it’s rewarded with food. Once your dog gets the idea of what you want, you can begin cutting down on the treats and eventually phase them out entirely.

If your dog isn’t that interested in doggy treats (try finding one who isn’t!) you can reward it with a physical incentive like a good tummy rub.

Time the rewards right
The praise and reward need to come immediately after your dog does what you want, otherwise it will not understand the connection between the action and the reward.

Keep it short and sweet
Training always works best if it’s fun for your dog and you keep the training period short so neither of you gets bored or frustrated. Try starting with 5-10 minutes a day, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies have shorter attention spans than older dogs. And don’t act like a drill-sergeant unless you’re training guard dogs.

Make it easy for your dog to get it right
If you attempt to train your puppy or dog in a dog park with dozens of interesting distractions, you’re going to be behind the eight ball and probably will never succeed at proper training. You need to train your pet slowly, starting in a quiet, familiar place with no distractions. After it has mastered some simple commands you can begin making the training more challenging for your dog. Don’t move on to the next step until your dog has mastered the current one.

Keep your cool
Yelling, hitting, and jerking your dog around by a leash won’t teach it how to sit on command, go outside when it needs to urinate, or do anything else you want it to learn. Calm, consistent training is the best way to get your dog to obey and respect you.

Don’t expect that once your dog has learned something, it’s ingrained for life. Your dog can lose its new skills if you don’t continue with regular practice of the commands you’ve taught.

Every dog is different and will respond better to different training styles. Some dogs are so sensitive that a sharp tone of voice can rattle them; they need calm, quiet guidance. Others may be slower to learn and need lots of repetition before they get all the rules down pat. Some dogs will occasionally push back when you push them, rather than give in to what you’re asking for.

Your dog’s behavior, not its breed, is the best indicator of its personality. Yelling, hitting, and other practices that cause pain or fear are never the solution for any dog’s misbehavior. These actions can create a behavior problem where none existed, or make an existing problem worse.

The bottom line in training your dog is the investment of your time to turn your relationship with your pet into a win-win situation. Do your homework first to learn how to communicate what you want in a way that your dog will understand. Be consistent and patient, and always reward your dog for getting it right.

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Dog duty

A few nice Dog images I found:

Dog duty
Dog

Image by The U.S. Army
Spc. Chase Couturiax, a tactical explosives detection dog handler with Troop C, 6th Squadron, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, rests with his dog, Sgt. Nina, during a foot patrol to counteract indirect fire near Combat Outpost Baraki Barak, May 21, 2013. TEDD teams help detect hidden explosives during joint U.S. and Afghan dismounted patrols, helping to keep U.S. and Afghan soldiers and local civilians safe. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Julieanne Morse, 129th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment/RELEASED)

Dog Tired
Dog

Image by garryknight
A soft-toy dog for sale in the shop by the Serpentine in London’s Hyde Park.

dogs riding sheep!
Dog

Image by kidicarus222
dogs riding sheep! dogs riding sheep! dogs riding sheep! dogs riding sheep! dogs riding sheep! dogs riding sheep! dogs riding sheep! dogs riding sheep! dogs riding sheep!

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3 Lessons: But Did I Learn Them?

If you all were here for my post last week, you will understand the whole thing with the 600 Brilliant Blog Post Ideas and where it came from, but if not, you can check it out here. If not, then read on.

242. What 3 lessons (good or bad) did you learn from your own mother (or person you see as being your maternal figure).

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LoveMy2Dogs

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Evolution of the Domestic Dog Redux

I’ve written about the evolution of the domestic dog before. What makes this such a great time to be a dog science geek is that in the few years since I wrote that post there’s been a lot of new research and new thought on the topic.

This is one of those subjects that is probably never going to be completely settled, at least not without time travel — and even then we would need a lot of luck. Chances are there was more than one "domestication event" and each one had likely slightly different factors contributing to its genesis.

This infographic, from The Uncommon Dog explains domestication with a bit of a hybrid view between the "adoption" theory that was very popular until relatively recently, and the self-domestication theory that I wrote about before (and still find more believable than adoption.) It’s an interesting take on the origins of the domestic dog.

What I really enjoyed about this graphic is the additional information about how dogs may have helped us survive. For more on that and on how we evolved together, start here and here.

Here’s the graphic. Enjoy! (Click for the full size version on the orginal site.)

canine_infographic_FIN

Evolution of the Domestic Dog Redux is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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Picture0001y 095

Check out these Topical images:

Picture0001y 095
Topical

Image by Grey Rocker

rose
Topical

Image by Grey Rocker
Freshness, Growth, Nature, Square, Extreme Close Up, Outdoors, High Angle View, Purple, Petal, Stamen, Day, Fragility, No People, Photography, Single Flower, leaf, green, rose, love, two roses

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