Cool Topical images

Some cool Topical images:

#CIRC2009: 3D Visualization Chinese Blogosphere
Topical

Image by inju
As screencapped from www.ustream.tv/channel/circ2009

Hedychium coronarium
Topical

Image by Eric Hunt.
Species from India

Photographed at the Conservatory of Flowers, San Francisco

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May 20, Green chlorophyll soup to increase red blood cells

I wanted to share my traumatic experience with you and other members. My female portugeuse 10 year old water Spaniel, Sooty, had a suspected serious immune
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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Is Your Toolbox Balanced?

"But I like to keep a balanced toolbox!"

I’m not sure how many times I’ve heard or read that one. It’s undoubtedly a big number. It’s usually the end or near the end of a trainer discussion on tools or techniques, and is intended to indicate that while a trainer (at least claims) to be primarily using tools and techniques that employ positive reinforcement, they also still like to use tools and techniques that rely on positive punishment/negative reinforcement. And they make this claim to open-mindedness with a brilliant rhetorical flourish! Or at least it probably seemed brilliant the first time it was used. I’m guessing around 1986.

But hey, what’s more open than reserving the right to use a leash pop or some electrical current when the going gets tough?

But really, we shouldn’t find this shocking (heh) when we still treat each other like this:

If pointless and gratuitous physical coercion to a kid is routine family TV (he really needed to sit in that chair NOW!) than how much sympathy do you think we can get for any non-human animal?

The fact is that human society is chock full of coercion and retribution. Last week I didn’t want to veer too far off into politics and I don’t want to go off on a philosophical tangent here, but consider how we treat each other. Coercion, whether it’s physical (most often with children) or not, is a big part of our society. Rewards are for frequent customers, credit cards, and bounty hunters. So it’s quite natural that our handling of non-human animals is even worse.

I’m currently enrolled in Dr. Susan Friedman’s Living and Learning with Animals course and just two weeks in I can see how this course is going to have a tremendous impact on how I work with both humans and dogs, and with how I solve problems. From the course description:

The philosophy of behavior underlying this course is that captive and companion animals, like all learners, must have power to operate effectively on their environment, in order to live behaviorally healthy lives.

Having the science of Applied Behavior Analysis carefully explained and also seeing it applied to a variety of different species has made it clear: it works.

But let’s look at more visceral example of how much someone can get done with a "closed toolbox:"

The elephant in this video is hanging out at the edge of the pen, happily responding to cues to move into different positions. (The electronic "beep" seems to be an event marker similar to a clicker.) If you watch the whole video you’ll see him lift his leg, allow the trainer to examine his ears, and respond to a variety of different cues. These are behaviors they use to care for the elephant with some fun stuff mixed in. Let’s review the zoo’s options for handling elephants.

  1. Restrain the elephant and force him to submit to handling. This is often where we end up with our children and our pets. Of course it’s easier to physically restrain a child or a dog than it is an elephant. (In Asia people do restrain elephants and treat them quite badly. They generally start out when the elephant is very small.)
  2. Sedate the elephant. This is risky, for both the elephant and the vet staff. It’s also of limited usefulness, since moving a sedated elephant is still a, pun intended, big problem. An awake cooperative elephant is a lot easier to work with.
  3. Don’t provide care for the elephant that requires cooperation. There are undoubtedly zoos that still choose this option.
  4. Do what we see here – convince the elephant that working with the trainer is a good thing.

Some would say that comparing this activity to working with a dog isn’t fair. The elephant is in a pen with steel columns protecting the trainer! I would tend to agree. Many people restrain their dogs so they can’t flee. This elephant has a choice the entire time – he could walk away from the bars any time he wants. But he stays. The trainer gave him a reason to.

This dog doesn’t have that choice:

I see two collars and some kind of head harness. And in case you missed the irony: one of the first steps in "teaching" a dog named a "Retriever" to "retrieve" is by forcing his mouth open by pinching the ear. Poke around Youtube some more and you’ll see video of a "well-respected" trainer needing to use a shock collar for the same procedure.

Yes, we need to shock dogs to get them to hold things in their mouth. I’m sure they’d say it’s complicated and we wouldn’t understand since we’re not professionals.

How did we get here? Where does the idea that when a dog (or child, or employee, etc.) doesn’t behave the way we want that meeting it with coercion and punishment (in the colloquial sense) isn’t just correct but virtuous?

Dr. Friedman refers to this phenomenon as "cultural fog.", based on a oft-cited quote from Gunnar Myrdal. The idea that rewards are "bribes" and the dogs and people should already be motivated to do the "right thing" as we define it is embedded in our culture. Dogs should work for praise. An employee’s reward for good work is more responsibility — which is corporate-speak for more work. And of course any popular artist seen taking money is a "sell-out."

So it’s not surprising that a "balanced toolbox" is seen not just as a necessity but as a badge of honor.

But I don’t accept that. If someone can convince a 15,000 pound elephant to cooperate with a physical examination without restraint or sedation, than there really is no excuse for needing coercion to get a dog to walk nicely on leash….let alone retrieve a bird.

I’ll take the smaller toolbox. Every time.

Is Your Toolbox Balanced? is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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Stock Futures Tick Up Ahead of Data-Light Day

Stock Futures Tick Up Ahead of Data-Light Day
Stock Futures Tick Up Ahead of Data-Light Day. Published November 22, 2013. Dow Jones Newswires. NYSE Floor (NYSE Trader). Reuters. Stock futures inched up on Friday a day after the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 16,000 for the first time 
Read more on Fox Business

Weston ConCom and Board of Health offer tips to avoid ticks
The trees are almost bare of leaves and you might be starting to pick them up before the first appreciable snow of the season. The Middlesex Tick Task Force (MTTF) wants to remind you that your don't have to be walking in the woods to be bitten by a
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Analysing the numbers that make the business jet market tick
Analysing the numbers that make the business jet market tick. Posted by: Alasdair Whyte November 25, 2013 in Blog, Top Stories. The global business jet fleet is increasing, but owners are holding on to aircraft for longer and sales are dragging. New
Read more on Corporate Jet Investor

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Riivia Microderm Abrasion Kit #Giveaway (ARV $299 ) Ends 12/1

Prize:

Riivia Microderm Abrasion Kit
ARV $ 299 
Hosted by:

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LoveMy2Dogs

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Evite Thank Yous

It’s a free service, it’s well-respected so it’s not SPAM, and the cards are very cute.

It took me a little while to copy and paste 100 names from my customer lis but that’s all done. I’m not going to send the Christmas evite cards until I have all of my sister’s customers entered, but I *am* starting to use it to send thank you’s for every order. I sent the first one off this morning :-)

In the card, I included my contact info, my website, and the toll-free order number from Trilogy. I also let this brand new customer know that I set her up as a Wholesale Customer, which means she will get 20% off on all orders except for the Clay Essentials line.

Val and I prefer to have lots of loyal, repeat customers who send us their friends than to get that 20% markup. We earn plenty on the volume, so we set everyone up as Wholesale after their first order. If they Autoship, we would lose that percent, anyway, so this just helps us build customer loyalty.
A day in the life of a HealthyPetNet Rep

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How long can you stay on topical steroids?

APFED’s Educational Webinar Series Presents… Answers from Experts How long can you stay on topical steroids? Jonathan Spergel MD, PhD Chief, Allergy Sectio…
Video Rating: 0 / 5

CORRECTION: I haven’t been healed for 30 months; I meant to say I’ve been off of topical steroids for 30 months. This is an update on my skin after suffering…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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Socializing Your Golden Retriever


Socializing your Golden Retriever is very important. As you may already know, all dog breeds behave different in front of strangers, with some dogs choosing to ignore people altogether. They may choose to glance at someone, then go on to pay no attention to him. On the other hand, some dogs are the total opposite and love to meet everyone they can. These types of dogs love attention, and will take any attention they can get.

Some Golden Retrievers are happy with those they have come to know in their own family, or those they have selected to be friends. Others on the other hand, may feel comfortable just around those of the same sex. Most Golden’s like children, although there are a few rare cases in which certain types of Golden Retrievers like adults but not children. This is extremely rare, and is normally due to the way they were bred or raised.

When your puppy is between the ages of 8 weeks and 8 months, socializing him is extremely important. During this time, you should always do everything you can to ensure that your Golden Retriever meets other people. Although he may be shy at first and not have much interaction, he will eventually come around. You will need to be patient with him during these times, as he will need quite a bit of reassurance from you.

Your dog’s parents also contribute to socialization. If the parents of your Golden Retriever were good with people and other dogs, the gene could very well be passed on to your dog. On the other hand, if the parents were shy or aggressive dogs, those genes could be passed on as well. Pups inherit the traits of their parents ,which is why it is very important to make sure that the dogs being bred are compatible with each other – and share a passive temperament.

If your puppy was separated from his mother before he reached the age of seven weeks, he won’t learn many of the social signals taught to him by his mom and his siblings. Golden Retriever pups that are brought to a new home earlier than seven weeks will normally tend to end up nippy or aggressive around people. Although they may be aggressive towards people, they may be shy or fearful around other dogs, as they lack the social skills needed to be themselves.

Sometimes, if a puppy was injured or frightened during his early years, he can end up with a state of trauma. This type of thing leaves a huge scar in the mind of a puppy, making it very hard for him to get past it. Most Golden Retriever pups that have been injured or frightened by an individual never get past it. They may end up fearing humans in general, or being very aggressive towards them when they feel frightened. When you take your puppy home for the first time, you should always make him feel welcomed, and never let anyone or anything harm him.

To better socialize your Golden Retriever, you should always make sure that he gets plenty of interaction with other people and other dogs in his breed. This way, your Golden will learn how to socialize at any early age. When he gets older in life, he will carry these skills with him. Golden Retrievers that are sheltered or not given the proper amount of interaction will turn out shy towards people and other dogs. With your Golden being your companion for life – you should always ensure that he gets the socialization he needs.
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Should Dogs Drink Salt Water

If you’re planning to head to the beach this summer and take your dog along, be sure to pack fresh water so your pet doesn’t have to drink salt water when it gets thirsty. Dogs should NOT drink saltwater for many reasons, among those being that salt water can cause vomiting and dehydration, as well as an unpleasant condition called “beach diarrhea.”

If you go to a beach that allows pets to run, play fetch, and interact with other dogs, your dog is going to get plenty of exercise which in turn causes increased water loss through muscle contraction, respiration, and evaporation from its skin. Exercising like this on a hot day at the beach will leave your dog with an urge to drink plenty of water and if you don’t provide fresh water, your dog will drink whatever it can find to drink, usually salt water.

Chances are good that a dog will ingest sand along with any salt water it drinks. This can intensify the effects of salt water and irritate the lining of the dog’s intestines. Drinking a smaller amount of salt water can cause “beach diarrhea.” In this type of diarrhea, salt water results in excess amounts of water accumulating in the dog’s intestines.

This is because salt water acts to pull liquids into your dog’s intestines which can then cause diarrhea and lead to dehydration. Also, if your dog drinks a lot of salt water too fast, it may vomit, which then leads to even more dehydration.

Bacteria, algae, microorganisms or toxins are sometimes found in salt water and these can lead to even more severe symptoms for your dog.

When you’re at the beach, give your dog clean, fresh water as often as you can. Giving your dog plenty of fresh water will significantly lessen any chance of it contracting a nasty beach diarrhea. You do not want your dog to drink salt water.

Your day at the beach should be as much fun for your dog as it is for you. Don’t spoil it by not taking along enough fresh water to keep your dog hydrated for your entire stay at the beach.

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Cool Lice images

Some cool Lice images:

Dead sea louse – underside, cropped
Lice

Image by avlxyz
must have been dredged up with the flounder

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