One Shot – Lice Meduze

One Shot – Kao Lice Meduze Nemojte kačiti video na svoje kanale. Sva prava zadržava Bassivity Digital. Produced by Coby Video by Nenad Grujičić download – ht…

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Dogs & Open Car Windows

Dogs & Open Car Windows

 

dog car windowExperts estimate that dogs can catch a whiff of something that’s one million times less concentrated than what humans can detect. With so much sniff power, it’s hardly surprising that they stick their heads out car windows. They could care less about the scenery. What they’re after are smells. If you’re driving through town at 30 miles an hour and your dog has his nose out the window, he knows where the bakery is, where the butcher shop is, which street leads to the local McDonald’s, and maybe even what the mayor had for breakfast.

 

Dogs assume a characteristic expression when they put their faces into the wind: Their upper

lips curl, their noses wrinkle, their eyes partly close, and their ears fold back. It looks as though they’re experiencing a moment of ecstasy (which they probably are) but mainly they’re concentrating. It’s as though they’re closing down all the rest of their senses to focus on this one.

 

There’s a world of fascinating scents outside the car. This dog loves to hang her head out the window and sample every one of them. All dogs, from huge Great Danes to tiny terriers, have extraordinarily acute senses of smell. Their scenting ability is enhanced when they are moving quickly, which is one reason that they take advantage of open car windows.

 

Smells are so important to dogs that they have two separate systems for detecting them. One is the nose system. It consists of a huge amount of tissue called olfactory epithelium, which is loaded with scent receptors. This area takes up about 1/2 square inch in humans, but up to 20 square inches in some dog breeds. As air moves over the tissue, odor molecules settle in millions of scent receptors. The more air flow there is, the more scents dogs detect. A Dog’s sense of smell is enhanced when they’re moving quickly. In the evolutionary scheme of things, this probably made them better hunters because they could load up on scents while chasing prey.

 

Dogs have a second smelling system that’s headquartered in their mouths. Near the upper

incisors is a tiny duct that leads to a specialized gland called Jacobson’s organ. It’s designed to capture and interpret the most primitive types of smells. Dogs depend on it to identify other

dogs, choose a mate, and smell prey. When dogs scrunch up their faces in the wind, it looks like they’re catching flies, but what they’re really doing is catching scents.

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Anybody Want to Adopt an Adorable Blind Dog AND His Seeing-Eye Dog?

Meet Jack and Chico, two Australian Cattle Dogs who found themselves at the MaxFund Animal Adoption Center in Denver after their owner passed away. Jack and Chico would very much like to be adopted as a pair. 

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You see, Chico is blind, and Jack is his seeing-eye dog. Jack accepts no payment or praise for his job. He does it because Jack is his best friend. He's known him all his life -- eight years now, for the both of them. 

"They're inseparable, basically. We walk them together. It's very easy," shelter volunteer Kathy Kelly-Weston told USA Today. "They're housed in the same room together and they really don't like being apart, especially Chico. It makes him kind of nervous."

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As Chico writes in his MaxFund adoption blurb, "You see, I've used dog doors, the scent of treats, and other friendly dogs like Jack to help me get along just fine despite my loss of vision."

He's a very intelligent dog, too.

"I'm smart and can open gate latches even though many 'sighted,' dogs couldn't master such a feat!" he writes. "I'm easygoing, friendly, love walks, car rides, water, know 'sit' and 'come,' and I'll brighten your days and make you smile. So come meet me, okay?"

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Jack, for his part, chimes in on his own MaxFund adoption blurb, making a play for Chico: "I'm easygoing, playful, and hoping my buddy, Chico, another friendly cattle dog, can come with me to a new home, too. I think you will find that the two of us will be just about as easy to care for as one!"

So if you or anyone you know would like two pretty great dogs who need a home, visit the MaxFund Animal Adoption Center and take a closer look at Chico and Jack. Spread the word, too! 

Via USA Today


The Scoop | The Scoop

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Cool Topical images

A few nice Topical images I found:

rose
Topical

Image by Grey Rocker
Freshness, Growth, Nature, Square, Extreme Close Up, Outdoors, High Angle View, Purple, Petal, Stamen, Day, Fragility, No People, Photography, Single Flower, leaf, green, rose, love, two roses

yellow orange colored flower
Topical

Image by Grey Rocker
Freshness, Growth, Nature, Square, Extreme Close Up, Outdoors, High Angle View, Purple, Petal, Stamen, Day, Fragility, No People, Photography, Single Flower, yellow, orange

A0000P0004
Topical

Image by Nottingham Vet School
A bottle of Frontline spray.

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Homemade Dog Food or Commercial Food with Different Ingredients Can Help

Many people are afraid of feeding different foods or ingredients due to generalized marketing from pet food companies and advice from veterinarians that have been trained with nutritional data generated by the same companies. Vets and pet owners are led to believe that brands are more important than ingredients.

I have found that some pets improve from skin and ear issues when they are changed to hypoallergenic kibble. (Duck, fish, rabbit, potato). Some with more severe medical problems (bowel issues, urinary crystals and stones, seizures) need moister, hypoallergenic, holistic canned food or home cooked food. Each animal may need a different mix of ingredients depending on their immune system and their medical problems.

Some recent cases have made me suspect that a higher fat content can initially causes skin problems to worsen.( Staph infections, yeast infections, hotspots, sores, and itching) Anti-yeast and antibacterial shampoos, 1:10 vinegar rinse (2x weekly)

http://www.douxo.us/dermatology/douxo-dermatology-dogs-seborrhea-mousse.html   

Antibiotics or anti yeast medication may also be needed if this occurs.

If itching gets initially better then worse on homemade diets, then a lower fat diet may be needed for a few months as the skin gets used to the new diet. I used to think that all pets needed and tolerated fat in the diet, but some may need a lower fat diet to start with. Just imagine getting used to eating larger quantities of protein and fat after eating kibble for years! If this is the case, leaner meat and less fat should be fed for several months if you are home cooking dog food.

In general, as long as you gradually introduce healthy human ingredients and make sure to feed different meats and veggies, dogs will thrive. Homemade dog food that rotates ingredients like chicken, pork, beef, fish, eggs, liver, heart, green beans, peas, carrots and slow cooked bones must be  nutritionally complete…hundreds of dogs thrive on it! I feed my dogs raw chicken wings to ensure that they get all the minerals they need. One or two chicken wings a week or a pig’s foot in the slow cooker along with other meats supplies calcium, phosphorus, and needed cartilage and joint nutrition. Nutritional supplements like Platinum Performance Canine will ensure that all vitamins and trace minerals are covered for those that feel better when adding supplements.

http://www.platinumperformance.com/pets/

Remember…dogs can be allergic and intolerant to many meats, grains, and veggies and fat content. That’s why I wrote Dog Dish Diet and Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet, to help pet owners learn how and what they can feed their dogs and cats. Whether it be better commercial food, raw food, or homemade food…each dog or cat may thrive on a different diet! Not all dogs or cats  will respond to a better diet, but it is much cheaper then vet bills. Give it a try!

Read about “Dog Dish Diet” and “Feed your Pet to Avoid the Vet” at

htpp://dogdishdiet.com/order-now

Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

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Sleepy Abby

This is little Abby, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel who lives in Beaulieu-sur-Mer – currently asleep on my coffee table!
RIVIERA DOGS

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Mica Ft Mite M – Hoe kon ik

Mica Ft Mite M – Hoe kon ik Songtekst: [Mica] Je zei van me te houden maar waarom doe je mij dan zoveel pijn ik dacht van je te houden, maar het is verledent…

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Evangelical Life Ministries, Houston, Texas – Evangelical Life Ministries Engaging Truth Radio Program

Evangelical Life Ministries, Houston, Texas – Evangelical Life Ministries Engaging Truth Radio Program from Evangelical Life Ministries Engaging Truth Radio Program Price: USD 0 View Details…



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Dog Training Blog | Tips and Dog Training Resources

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How to Stop Leash Aggression

brown dog on leash

Brown dog is ready to go

It may be the oldest story in dog training: a dog that is an otherwise perfectly-behaved, downright sweet, and beloved member of the family, will growl, bark, lunge, and may even bite another dogs he encounters on leash. Take the leash off and he is a model citizen at the dog park or day care.

What’s up with that?

Well first of all, leash aggression is a very common problem. If you have ever described it to a dog trainer you may have noticed her complete lack of surprise. Many trainers have classes dedicated to this problem. It’s common enough in my area that I already have an ongoing series of blog posts about it over here. (And my dedicated classes are coming soon.)

So relax, you’re not alone.

You can poke around my blog series after you finish this, but here’s a quick rundown on what causes it and how to diminish or maybe even eliminate the problem.

Where does leash aggression come from?

Leash aggression is often caused by fear, frustration, or both. The fear can come from a lack of socialization as a puppy, from a bad past experience, or from feeling restrained with a leash attached. Frustration can come from not being able to get to a dog because of being on leash, which generalizes to “seeing dogs while on leash is always frustrating.”

Of course these factors can combine to feed each other, and other issues may be involved. The good news is finding out the exact causes is not critical to addressing the problem.

What can we do to address leash aggression?

I already gave you the first step: relax. Your tensing up when you see another dog or worse, yelling and yanking the leash when your dog is acting out, doesn’t help. I know it’s not easy, but work on it. It’ll help a lot.

Check your hardware. Despite relatively recent efforts to "rebrand" them, slip (or choker) collars and prong collars are really intended for corrections. The slip collar is for manually delivering a leash correction by "popping" the leash. The prong can also be used for leash corrections and will administer a "pinch" when the dog pulls ahead on leash. (I don’t use either device or corrections, but that’s not the point right now.) What do you suppose happens to a dog that is lunging at the end of a leash when wearing one of these collars? If nothing else it will increase his stress level, worst case he will associate the corrections with what he is looking at: another dog.

I prefer harnesses for dogs with leash aggression. Taking the pressure off of the neck can relieve a great deal of stress, even when compared to a simple flat collar. With a large or strong dog a "front clasp" harness like an Easy Walk or SENSE-ible can also help the person holding the leash maintain control.

Work on attention. A few of the blog posts in my series talk about using attention to keep your dog focused on you and not on the other dogs. If you can get attention on cue with his name or a cue like "look!" it can also serve as way to redirect focus back to you if it slips.

You need to pay attention. Put the phone away. Finish your coffee before you walk. Try to map out your route in advance. If you live in a densely populate area like many of my clients it’s probably impossible to avoid other dogs, but you can at least be prepared!

Work on counter-conditioning and desensitization. This is worth seeing a trainer for, and honestly a session with a trainer is a good idea for this problem anyway. Fear and frustration are emotional responses, and working on changing the association is going to be a key part in any solution.

That’s the short version. There’s a lot more over here. and a few more posts on counter-conditioning and desensitization on the way. Subscribe to my newsletter for updates. The box is up on the right.

How to Stop Leash Aggression is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Jersey City New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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DermTV – Why You Should Only Apply Antioxidants at Night [DermTV.com Episode #138]

For topical antioxidants to work most effectively, you should apply them at nighttime. Dr. Schultz explains why. www.DermTV.com Become a fan on Facebook www.facebook.com

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