Ticks Can Kill Moose?

Ticks can attack moose in droves, draining their blood and possibly killing them. Moose: Titans of the North : SAT MARCH 8 10P et/pt : http://channel.nationa…

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“THE TRANSITION WAS LIKE WITNESSING A MIRACLE”

BoWe received this letter from Jess Ram about her three year old miniature poodle named Bo and would like to share it with our blog readers.

Praise to Halo

Grain-free turkey, duck, and pheasant food for dogs is fantastic! I have a three year old miniature poodle, Bo, that I rescued. I spent a year trying several different foods that he would eat and want to eat like a “normal” dog. He always would have “bubble gut” and eat about every other day or sometimes every two days.

I finally came across Halo in a local pet store…true story; the bag attracted me because my favorite color is purple. I read the ingredients and liked what I read. I took it home and gave a sample to Bo and he ate it up without hesitation. I wasn’t convinced yet because come on, who doesn’t like something new brought home to them.

The transition was like witnessing a miracle; Bo ate every day! He has been on Halo for three months now and I am just blown away. No more “bubble gut!” Even my cats trys to sneak away a kibble or two. They too will soon be transitioning to Halo.

I am very pleased and impressed with Halo food and what the company stands by and for.

Thank you!
Bo and Jessi

Thank you Jessi for sharing Bo’s story with us and we are so happy to hear that Bo is doing so well.

Halo

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Just a Picture

Lacey’s been feeling a little neglected on the blog lately so I thought I’d share a picture. We were practicing some “obedience” at the park and it never takes long for her to default to her favourite trick.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Nice Lice photos

Some cool Lice images:

Goniocotes gallinae
Lice

Image by Albus.
Poultry fluff louse, ventral view, brightfield, objective 4X

Goniocotes gallinae
Lice

Image by Albus.
Poultry fluff louse, dorsal view, head, objective 4X

Goniocotes gallinae
Lice

Image by Albus.
Poultry fluff louse, ventral view, darkfield, objective 4X

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Kooly The Bear And Friends Give Back To America

True American Dog

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Caring for Your Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Pet Dog

The soft coated wheaten terrier would be considered by most people to be “high maintenance”. This means that a lot of care should be given to it in order to maintain its stature. This statement also means that a lot of steps should be taken in order to care for the dog properly. So how do you care for your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog?

Let us first talk about the coat. This is one of the most distinguishing characteristics of a soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. In fact, when you take a look at the name, you will realize that the coat gives the dog its identity. Taking care of this essential part of the soft coated wheaten terrier dog can be quite a daunting task. This is especially true if you have just found out about the various standards that people use to judge the beauty of a soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

Frequent grooming is required to keep the coat shiny and to prevent matting. It also helps get rid of any accumulated dirt. You should comb or brush your soft coated wheaten terrier dog everyday to make sure that his coat remains silky and tangle-free. The coat also needs to be trimmed once in a while to preserve the “terrier look” and to allow a new coat to grow.

Besides the coat, you should also take care of the nails and teeth of your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. In case that you do not know what to do by yourself, you might want to hire some professional dog grooming services to do the job for you.

Another aspect you should concentrate on is the training. Remember to train your soft coated wheaten terrier dog as early as possible in order to ingrain in him the basics of proper behavior. There are several keywords that should come to your mind when training your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog:

1) Consistency – be consistent with your teaching. Do not use different commands in order to get the same response as this will only serve to confuse your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. You should also be consistent in terms of reward and punishment. This will help your dog understand what you want to happen.

2) Tone – a soft coated wheaten terrier dog is actually pretty sensitive to the tones in the human voice. This means that the dog will be able to tell if you are feeling upset or if you are feeling impatient. You need to learn how to moderate your tone in order to avoid confusion with your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

3) Timing –learn the proper timing of when to correct your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. The element you need during correction is surprise. You need to correct the soft coated wheaten terrier for a mistake right after or even before it performs the act. This way, you will be able to instill a sense of consequence into your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

Caring and training for your soft coated wheaten terrier can be quite a bit of work. You will also have to contend with the energy inherent in every terrier breed. However, with patience, your efforts will be rewarded.
Welcome to The Top Dog Blog!

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Nice Lice photos

A few nice Lice images I found:

AMNH Louse Collection
Lice

Image by VSmithUK
Slide mounted Phthiraptera.

Beggar’s Lice
Lice

Image by mrtickles
Lee’s Summit, Missouri

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The Dog of the Highlands: West Highland White Terrier

At around 1700s, the Isle of Skye and other highlands in Scotland were already producing lots of small terriers. Scottish breeds were separated into two: the Skye terriers and the Dandie Dinmont terriers.

The Dandie Dinmonts were categorized as a separate breed. The Skyes included the Scotties, the Cairns and the West highland white terriers or the Westies.

It was also noted that these terriers were the hybrids among the crossed Cairns, Scottish, and Dandies terriers. One could assume that the hybrid would really be loyal and its hunting instincts could not be belittled. In fact, many royalties in Scotland owned terriers that were very similar to the Westies of today.

Another remarkable story is about a Westie that stopped a mother from constantly yelling at her daughter. Every time the mother would yell at her teenage daughter, the Westie would attack the mother. The aggression of the dog got worse over the years that resulted in the mother’s complete inability to scold her teenager.

It turned out that the girl was actually rewarding the dog for his protection by calming and soothing him down after every “threat” from her mother. Many would perceive that the daughter was able to help her mother to change her ways when in fact she was helping herself by rewarding the dog for its behavior.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Westies:

Category: Terrier
Living Environment: indoors (highly recommended); outdoors (fenced yard)

Coat: about two-inch coarse and wiry outer coat and soft, dense, and furry undercoat
Color: white

Height: between 10 and 12 inches

Weight: between 13 and 22 pounds

Temperament:

Naturally,

•    they like to bark and dig
•    they are not as willful like most terriers
•    they love companionship

When properly trained

•    they can become fairly friendly towards strangers
•    they develop close affinity with behaved children
•    they love to chase cats but they do not hurt them
•    they can become a very good watch dog
•    they can become very lively

Breeders should note of the following health issues:

•         Chronic skin problems
•       Perthe’s disease (hip problems)
•       Jawbone calcification
•       Cranio mandibular osteopathy (lion jaw)
•       Patella luxation, a disorder in the kneecap
•       Liver ailments
•       Deafness
•       Congenital heart disease

Care and Exercise:

•    Their coat should be brushed regularly using a brush with stiff bristles.
•    They should bathe only when necessary.
•    Their whole coat should be stripped at least twice a year and trimmed every four months.
•    The fur on the eyes and ears should be trimmed using blunt-nose mirrors.
•    They will surely be more agile and healthy after regular sessions of play and/or walk.

Origin/History:

As noted, they share the same lineage with Cairns and Scotties (from Skye terriers), and even with the Dandies. This trio was developed in the Isle of Skye, which was one of the highlands in Scotland. It was noted that white whelps were chosen from the wiry-coated Cairns, Scotties, and Dandies to produce the variety that were known as Poltalloch terriers.

Following are some items in the history that show the Westies’ reputation of being owners’ favorite companion dogs.

Records in the history mentioned that around 1620, King James 1 of England requested some small white dogs from Argyleshire in Scotland. Colonel Malcolm, who was considered as the originator of Poltalloch terriers, that are very similar to the Westies of today, accidentally shot his terrier (a dark one). From then on he vowed to have only white terriers.

In the 19th century, terriers that were very similar to the Westies were known as Roseneath terriers in honor of Duke of Argyll’s interest and patronage of this breed. Roseneath was the name of his estate at Dumbartonshire. 

In the first-ever dog show that were organized in the late 1800s, the Westies were called as White Scottish terriers. In 1904, they were classified under the name West Highland White terriers.

During the mid-1900s, breeders of the Cairns in Argyll, Scotland selected white puppies from the stock and interbreed some to obtain white Cairns. However, in 1917, the American Kennel Club ruled that Cairns could be listed if they have the Westies’ lineage.
  
We can say the history repeats itself for this delightful terrier is now mostly a favorite companion dog of many households.


Welcome to The Top Dog Blog!

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In Memory Of…

As today is the one year anniversary of the pet food recalls, this is an open thread for anyone and everyone to speak their mind, share their thoughts, express their loss or simply encourage and support each other.

Itchmo: News For Dogs & Cats

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Some cool Topical images:

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Topical

Image by Nottingham Vet School
A bottle of Surolan, Active ingredient Miconazole nitrate, polymyxin B sulfate, prednisolone acetate

Tropical sunset
Topical

Image by notcub

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