Worst Owner Ever Attempts to Euthanize His “Gay” Dog

Have you seen the news? It’s a tale beyond belief: A Tennessee dog owner surrendered his dog — a Pit Bull-Bulldog mix — to the Jackson Rabies Control Animal Shelter, to be killed. What was the dog’s crime? The owner saw the dog mounting another male dog. To the owner, this meant his dog is gay, and in that small, broken brain of his, that meant the dog had to be killed.

What a world.

Luckily, word of this travesty erupted into the Internet, because it had to. Someone who keeps tabs on the dogs being euthanized at the Jackson Rabies Control Animal Shelter — a high-kill shelter — made it so, when he wrote up the circumstances on his Facebook page, Jackson TN Euthanasia:

This guy [the dog] was signed over to [Rabies Control], not [because] he’s mean or [because] he tears things up, but because … his owner says he’s gay! He hunched another male dog so his owner threw him away [because] he refuses to have a “gay” dog! Even if that weren’t the most asinine thing I’ve ever heard, it’s still discrimination! Don’t let this gorgeous dog die [because] his owner is ignorant of normal dog behavior! He’s in kennel 10L and he WILL be put down tomorrow [because] there is no room at the inn!

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Naturally, this thing took off. Adoption offers poured in. According to a shelter worker who prefers to be unnamed, “I have had about 10 million calls this morning. It has been adopted already. It is gone. He’s in good hands.”

Whose hands? Stephanie Fryns, a veterinary tech from Jackson, who adopted the dog and named him Elton John. Elton John is going to a good home; Fryns already has four happy dogs.

She told ABC News that the dog “was pretty friendly so far. He’s pretty scared of everything, which is understandable. But he loved the car ride.”

As for the stupidity of the former owner, let's return to that for a sec. Animal expert Stanley Coren told the Daily News, “A male mounting another male is thus not displaying homosexual tendencies, but is simply saying, ‘I'm boss around here.’” 

Or, as that unnamed shelter worker put it, “You know, those dogs get on top of each other sometimes.”

You don't say. 

As for all those people who wanted to adopt the poor dog, well, there's no shortage of dogs facing death at the Jackson Rabies Control Animal Shelter. Just check the Facebook page of the guy who broke the story. He calls himself Jackson Madison Rabies Control Stalker, and his page is full of photos of dogs who are to be put to death within days. They deserve as much attention as Elton John.


The Scoop | The Scoop

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Dog Health Symptom: Does your dog itch like crazy but has no parasites?

Dog Health Symptom: Does your dog itch like crazy but has no parasites?

 

dog dermatitisAre you worried that your dog may have a serious dog health symptom due to his bothersome itchy skin?  Does he scratch uncontrollably but without any apparent signs of fleas or tics?  Dog health symptoms such as this may not be related to those nasty little parasites after all.

 

One such dog health symptom is called Dermatitis.  Just like people experience hay fever, dogs also suffer the same type of fever.  The main difference is that while men and women will show signs of being congested and will sneeze a lot after inhaling pollen, dogs will immediately come down with bothersome itchy skin that makes them scratch like crazy.

 

The allergy is very progressive and works very fast to show signs of the dog health symptom of Dermatitis.  Take notice of most typical cases where your dog may start itching around the months of August and September.  Dog health symptoms will generally always start during these two months.  Your pet will become extremely sensitive to other substances.

 

While carrying this dog health symptom, she will also start itching badly in the tree pollen season of March and April.  But it is not over yet.  Because your pet is carrying the dog health symptom of Dermatitis, she will then start scratching during the grass pollen season of May, June, and typically early July.

 

As you can see by now, this dog health symptom can be very serious and eventually lead to year-round scratching problem.  Your dog will become so sensitive to all other substances around them that she could start reacting violently to the simple dust and mold that is found around most houses.

 

If your dog is less than six months old (a puppy) then you usually will not need to worry about the dog health symptom of dermatitis.  Typically, Dermatitis begins in dogs at a later age of three years old.  But do not think that you can discount any particular breed.  All breed of dog can be affected by Dermatitis.

 

Remember, Dermatitis is a dog health symptom that can last a very long time and cause severe discomfort to your dogs skin.  As stated above, it can affect most any breed, but is especially a concern for West Highland White Terriers, Dalmatians, Poodles, and White Haired Fox Terriers.

 

Is there a treatment for this dog health symptom?  There are indeed treatments but it is necessary to talk to your veterinarian.  Your vet will run a skin test first to determine the cause of the dog health symptom in question.  The treatment may lead to cortisone and a series of injections to stop the allergic sensitivity.

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dog-eared

Some cool Dog images:

dog-eared
Dog

Image by E>mar
a dog with an ear for music at the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass festival

Dog & Cat
Dog

Image by Clover_1
A hugging dog and cat collect alms in the streets of Cannes, France.

Dog days
Dog

Image by AMagill
Last week I found out that the local public pool switches over from humans to dogs at the end of the summer. I took Samantha last weekend. She did a little swimming, but she was much more interested in just running around and wrestling with some of the other dogs. I was impressed by this dog, though- he was running and jumping off the diving board to get balls.

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Sep 12, My doggie doesn’t take dry dog foods

My puppy doesn’t take dry dog food and I’m very upset for cuty health. Suggest me. Answer by Barbara: My dog was the same way. He didn’t eat dry dog
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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The Loyal Working Companion Dog: American Pit Bull Terrier


This breed of dog, also fondly called as APBT, is known for its loyalty and intelligence. The dogs with this breed make excellent companions since they are very aggressive because of their protective nature.

How, then, are they different from the Staffies? For the UKC or the United Kennel Club, Staffies and APBT are of the same breed but many disapprove of this suggestion. For instance, if the American Kennel Club has an American Staffordshire terrier, it will be registered as an American pit bull terrier by the United Kennel Club. Furthermore, many breeders noted that their lineages have been separate for a long time already for these dogs to be still considered as having the same variety.

Meanwhile, the American Kennel Club does not register a UKC-listed American pit as an American Staffie. In order to gain dual-registry, the dog must initially be recorded as an AKC American Staffie before it can be listed with the UKC as an American pit bull, and not the other way around.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about APTBs:

Category: Terrier

Living Environment: either outdoor or indoor

Coat: smooth, shiny, thick, and short

Colors: color varies

Height: between 18 and 22 inches

Weight: between 30 and 60 pounds

Temperament: courageous, full of energy, and loyal; should be socialized early on with other animals especially with children

Health Issues: heart murmurs and mange

Care and Exercise:
• Bathe when necessary.
• Brush their coat only occasionally using a brush with firm bristles.
• Rub down their coat with a towel or a chamois to remove hairs that are loose.
• Their physique requires a regular exercise routine which includes a daily play time and/or running along a bicycle while on a leash.
• They should be on leash while walking in public places.

Origin/History:

The ancestors of APBT came to the US in the mid-1800s with some Irish-Boston immigrants. Like the Staffie, they were originally bred from bulldogs and terriers. Since APBT is a forerunner to the Staffie, it was also molded to be a fighting dog. However, the Americans made their variety some pounds heavier and trained them to have a more powerful head.

Bull baiting and dog baiting were prohibited in England so bull terriers were no longer bred for bouts. It is in America where the pit bull also gained its popularity for many uses and reasons like:

1. It was used to embody the country in one WW1 artwork.
2. Well-known companies like the Buster Brown Shoe Company and even RCA used the breed as mascots.
3. Petie, a pitbull, was one of the stars in, “Our Gang”, a well sought children’s TV series.
4. A mix breed called Stubby was transformed into a popular and decorated WW1 hero.
5. Pits became good companies of pioneer families on their journeys.
6. Jack, a working pit bulldog was owned by Laura Wilder of lines of books called “Little House”.
7. Popular people like Helen Keller and US President Theodore Roosevelt owned the variety.

Here is some history about the cause of dilemma regarding the registries of APBTs.

In 1898, the United Kennel Club or UKC was structured to provide fighting guidelines and registration for APBT as fighting dogs. Later, there were breeders who shun away from dog fighting so they asked the AKC to recognize their pits so they would be fit for performance events like dog shows.

In 1935, the AKC approved of their petitions but the dogs were registered as Staffordshire Terriers, naming them after the little province in England that the breed was known to have originated from. Thus, many breeders have dogs that have dual-registry.

It is interesting to note that Petie, which was one of the stars in the, “Our Gang” TV series was the first breed that was dual-registered to be Staffordshire Terrier/Pit Bull. However, the UKC later started registering other performing-type varieties and they also began holding dog shows comparable to those of the American Kennel Club.

The AKC soon sealed its studbooks to APBTs. They allocated registration to those pit breeds with lineages that are listed as Staffies. For a little time during the 1970s, the AKC disclosed the American pits to their studbooks.

In 1973, the American KC decided to add the word “American” with the pit’s name to discriminate it from a Staffie. At present, those dogs with mixed APTB-StaffIe parents are recognized by UKC and even the American Dog Breeders’ Association as “American pits or American pit bull terriers”.

Nowadays, the pit has employed as search and rescuers, police/armed service dogs, livestock workers, and even as therapy animals because they are good as companions and working dogs.

Moreover, the variety can even compete in dog sports such as herding, obedience, and conformation, French Ring, and Schutzhund. Breeds of this type can be very loving as pets for everyone. The physical demands and harshness of various activities developed a healthy, strong, and stable animal.

If you want to have an APBT as a pet, be sure that the puppy is handled well and properly socialized. A solid and good training will surely produce an obedient, tranquil, and good companion or even a working dog!
Welcome to The Top Dog Blog!

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Deer Tick-Dirty Dishes

Deer Tcik- Dirty Dishes, from the album “War Elephant”
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Hi Cyndra – You're doing such good work with y…

Hi Cyndra – You're doing such good work with your dog already. We don't think dogs have to enjoy close contact with all other dogs at all — Being well behaved (calmly ignoring) is a more realistic goal. That said, the more well behaved dogs your dog is exposed to, the more tolerant she'll become. You can accomplish much of this by fostering for a savvy rescue group and giving her lots of opportunities to practice her dog skills (supervised by you of course) in a way that is good for her and maybe even fun. My own pit bull female used to be qute the snarky bitch as a youngster, but has shown us that lots of positive exposure to dogs will soften even the roughest edges. Fifteen years later, I've actually forgotten how rotten she used to be with dogs and how much work we had to do to navigate and direct her interactions. Make each interaction count and work hard to keep each one as positive as possible and remember to tell her how proud you are of her when she does well.
BAD RAP Blog

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Cesar Millan, Shorty Rossi on The Jeff Probst Show

Fans of talk shows and Fidos can tune in to watch an episode of The Jeff Probst Show that’s filled with dogged devotion as two top dogs in the world of canine care sit down with the Survivor…



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DogTipper

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Kpop Music Mondays – U-Kiss “Tick Tack”

For more, go to www.eatyourkimchi.com On Facebook: www.facebook.com On Twitter: www.twitter.com Watch the Full Playlist here: www.youtube.com This week we review U-Kiss’ “Tick Tack” for Kpop Music Monday and wonder in amazement at Kiseop’s superhuman strength. –The Showdown– U-Kiss “Tick Tack” – www.youtube.com (teaser) www.youtube.com (official video) IU “You and I” – www.youtube.com Thanks to B1A4 Chile for the Spanish subs! Woot! — www.facebook.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Dog person through and through

I’ve always been a dog person, unabashed, and proud of it. From the time my first Lhasa bit me at eight years old, then snuggled into my arm before pooping in my shoe, it was all over. I’m helpless.

Cats were a creature I had to work at liking. We never had one growing up; in fact, until veterinary school, I never lived with one. Now that I have Apollo and have come to appreciate their unique characteristics, I can’t imagine my life without one. I wouldn’t quite say I’m a cat lady, but I do like them quite a bit.

Kids, on the other hand, have always been an enigma to me. As a teenager, I babysat for lack of better alternatives for employment, my mother (correctly) assuming that there is no better deterrent to teenage motherhood than actually having to be around young children for extended periods of time. As I got older and my friends started having children, I was the one who sat frozen at showers, holding a newborn at arms’ length with my face frozen in a rictus, wondering what I was supposed to do with it and how long I had to hold it before I could give it back.

Then I went ahead and had children. Oh, how much I’ve learned. With time and deeper understanding over eight years of being immersed in children, I can now say with confidence this: I still don’t get kids.

Don’t get me wrong. I love my children. They are amazing and I am glad every day that I have them. That being said, I’m not particularly good with them. I do what I can, and I think I’m doing OK until I look across the room at Mrs. Sunny McMommerton with her 5 layer organic bento and her cheery application of 5 various scented versions of hand sanitizer and I realize, wow, I’m flat out mediocre at this parenting thing. I’m no closer to understanding the inner workings of a Kid Person any more than, say, Mustang Guys, or Parrot People. I am standing in the circle and looking around and still not sure what it is I’m looking at.

I volunteered quite extensively in my daughter’s classroom in kindergarten, out of a sense of obligation more than the deep sense of satisfaction obtained from explaining to five year olds why paste ingestion is not a good idea. I took on the much-ballyhooed role of “Room Mom” in my son’s classroom last year, which was even worse because then I had to navigate not only the political manueverings of the PTA Halloween carnival booth assignments, but I had to keep track of who was gluten intolerant versus peanut intolerant versus matchstick intolerant for holiday parties.

Oh, yes, the Matchbox Incident, as we call it in this house. That was the last straw. This year, we’re in a very different and much improved school, but I’m not in the classroom much at all. While I regret not having more time to be immersed in the educational system, I can’t say I miss it, because then I would be a liar and I feel the need to be deeply honest with you all.

I had to go to Babies R Us yesterday to pick up a gift. While many friends of mine wax nostalgic at the big purple sign, sighing at the “Expectant Mommy” parking and wondering about just one more, I walk through the front door, see the rows of strollers and watermelon-bellied women wrestling carseats into minivans, and all I feel in my stomach is the gnawing lump of anxiety at the thought of going through that all over again. Sure, I smile at other people’s babies and I even know the right way to hold them now, but I look at them with the mildly interested civility one would normally show in mixed company. I’m not anti-child, I just don’t rush over to be first in line to tickle one or anything.

After that trip, I went to the hair salon. As we were finishing up, one of the stylists came in with a new puppy. I sensed it before I saw it, the certainty that something adorable and sweet has just entered the building. I stood up, knocking three people out of the way in the process, and levitated like one of those Twilight vampire things straight to the little furry moppet with a huge giant “SQUEEEEEEEE OMG I’M A VET LET ME HOLD HER AIEEEEE!”

A picture of me doing this with a random baby human does not exist.

As I unthinkingly commandeered the puppy for snorgles, my brain obligated by sheer instinct to place hands on fur, it hit me- Oh, so this is what it’s like for those baby feet squeezers. It all seems so clear when you see it from the outside. I guess you either have it or you don’t.

So I’m not going to worry about whatever little chips I may or may not be missing; for whatever reason my maternal chip was implanted with a dog face on it, and that’s OK.

So yes, that is it in a nutshell. I am a dog person. How about you?

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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