Hip Dysplasia in Weimaraners

The Weimaraner is a relatively new breed of dog that dates back only to the 19th century. They were bred by noblemen of the Weimar court who wanted a breed that embodied a good sense of smell, strong intelligence, fearlessness and especially speed, as they were used for hunting wolves and deer. Unfortunately, as the breed developed through the generations, hip dysplasia in Weimaraners became a common disease.

Weimaraners are noted for being devoted to their family, whether that ‘family’ is a single person or one replete with several children.

Weimaraners are not the type of dogs who obey routine commands or whose habits can be predictable. They are smart dogs, but choosy about how they use their intelligence. They sometimes may seem bored while being taught rote commands, but will demonstrate that they have learned the commands to please their owner. But as soon as they’re left alone, they begin finding ways to disobey.

They have a tendency to try to control the entire family if not trained properly. They require a strong-willed owner who has the time and the ability to train and play with them. They need lots of love and attention, and vigorous daily exercise to be happy, contented and compliant pets. If neglected or treated badly, they will often resort to destructive behavior which may include excessive barking and damage to your home and property. They need plenty of exercise, and if available, a yard to run and play in.

However, Weimaraners are very good at escaping from yards. They have been known to unlatch gates and jump over tall fences. They should not be left alone in a yard for lengthy periods of time.

Weimaraners are large dogs and generally not suited to living in apartments. Their size and high level of activity can cause them to knock things about without realizing it.

Weimaraners are the personification of grace, balance and swiftness. They have strong muzzles and long, hanging ears. Their intelligent eyes may be light gray, bluish gray or light amber. They have long necks and long, muscular legs with webbed feet. Their coats are usually glossy, smooth and short, and come in shades of gray.

A healthy Weimaraner can live as long as 17 years with the average being 12 to 14 years. Common health problems include tumors, immune system disorders, and hip dysplasia. They are also prone to bloating – so rather than one big meal a day, two smaller meals a day is better.

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected. The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is an example of a normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is an example of an abnormal hip joint:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development. Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Weimaraners. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Prevent Hip Dysplasia & Improve Your Dogs Health Today.

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Cool Mite images

A few nice Mite images I found:

Hungry Red Mites

Image by dbnunley
These tiny little flowers blossomed today and the red mites found them immediately. The mites are very small – pinhead size or maybe a little smaller. This was shot with a Raynox DCR 150 or 250 lens.

View On Black

Mighty Mites.02

Image by Boz Bros
Mighty Mites practice 1941

Mighty Mites.03

Image by Boz Bros
Mighty Mites practice 1941

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Boxer Dog Training

Boxer Dog Training

Boxer breed dogThe Boxer is an amazing dog and is extremely playful, energetic and definitely a handful (in a good way of course). This breed if dog is extremely loyal and when a friendship is built it lasts forever. The boxer is very unique and not for everyone, if you’re a new owner of a boxer you have to be aware that they need a lot of attention and training. They are extremely intelligent dogs which can work to your advantage when it comes to training, but then again can be very disadvantageous as they know how to use their intelligence to get what they want.


Boxer dog training consists of training them up to become guard dogs, this is their main profession if you like. People who don’t know boxers tend to assume that they are naturally aggressive when they are in fact the opposite and couldn’t be more playful than any other dog! Because of their good stature and aggressive look, people are automatically assuming this dog could do more harm than good. If your boxer isn’t trained properly then he just might.


Because of their intelligence Boxers can be very stubborn but when it comes to training a boxer it can be very helpful. Owners must remember that there will be times when you ask him to do something and he’s going to look you in the face and basically tell you where to go, he knows he is supposed to do what you are telling him but he decides he can’t be bothered and doesn’t. The main thing you have to remember in these circumstances is to be patient. From as early as 6 weeks old you should start your boxer dog training as this will help him when he grows up, socialize him, play with him and teach him, but do it in an exciting way and he is more likely to listen.


The main aspect of training for a boxer is socialization. Boxers can be very friendly dogs but they need to be trained to become one. They need to get accustomed to other dogs and people. The best way to do this is training classes. That way your boxer will be trained alongside other dogs.


When your boxer reaches 13-16 weeks old it’s time for some serious boxer dog training, this is the stage where he is going to test for dominance, he will nip and try to show you that he is the more dominant one, mainly by not listening to you. You have to be a strong leader at this time, you must show him that him acting like that will not be tolerated no matter what!


Boxers are genuinely a lovable family dog and would make a proud pet for anyone, they are dogs that prefer to sit on you lap for a cuddle than anything else. Train your boxer early with some serious boxer dog training and you can be assured you will have a stunning, loyal family friend!

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Halo Curve article1In its April issue, Curve Magazine featured Halo in its two-page article: “The Halo Effect – Pet Food Gets a New Holistic Spin.”

Halo’s VP of product development and marketing, Bettie Hamilton, is quoted extensively, sharing Halo’s holistic philosophy and dedication to giving back to the community.

“Nutrition is such a crucial driver of overall Health,” says Bettie Hamilton, VP of marketing and product development at Halo. “But it’s not just the food – it’s the interaction between the owner, the pet and the environment.”


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Nice Pest photos

Check out these Pest images:

2010 DoD Pest Management Workshop February 2010 (25)

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
Picture from the DoD Pest Management Workshop held in Jacksonville, FL.

2010 DoD Pest Management Workshop February 2010 (90)

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
Picture from the DoD Pest Management Workshop held in Jacksonville, FL.

2010 DoD Pest Management Workshop February 2010 (36)

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
Picture from the DoD Pest Management Workshop held in Jacksonville, FL.

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Xena and Lana

Not all Monte Carlo ladies strut around in 6 inch heels. Some, like these two ladies,  are more interested in their dogs and were taking a rest with them on a bench in the Casino Gardens.

The Griffon is called Xena and she is 4 years old. And the Jack Russell terrier is called Lana and she is 3.

Both are rescue dogs now living a wonderful life in Monaco with these two fabulous Monte Carlo ladies.


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For those of us keeping score…

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Latest Mite News

Mite Bite

Image by mshobe
This makes more sense in the context of this post I wrote. Man, I look kinda vein-y today; blech.

Dy-no-mite!: 'Good Times' coming to big screen
It's the year of the remake as Sony Pictures and producer Scott Rudin will turn the hugely popular '70s sitcom "Good Times" into a feature film! The movie will be set in the 1960s and will be written by Phil Johnston, who has worked on recent
Read more on HLNtv.com

Mite Madness cross-ice jamboree a hit a decade later
A Clifton Park mite skater scores on the Saratoga Youth Hockey goalie Sunday afternoon during the Mite Madness X-Ice Tournament at the Clifton Park Arena. (STAN HUDY/shudy@saratogian.com). CLIFTON PARK — College basketball took a back seat
Read more on cnweekly

The Modest House Dust Mite Helps Topple a Darwinian Evolutionary Postulate
Mites are on our family's mind. Our kids' school is embroiled in a semi-hysterical mini-scare over a possible outbreak of scabies, an itchy rash associated with scabies or "itch" mites (Sarcoptes scabiei). The condition is highly contagious in a school
Read more on Discovery Institute

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Holistic Diets for Dogs : Not Just for Humans Anymore

Dogs know two things: our love and the love you can’t eat. For many dog lovers, it can sometimes be difficult to separate the two, especially when berated with a pleading look from those soulful, manipulative eyes. However, just as it is not good for humans to eat certain ingredients ourselves, it is the same  for dogs, which can have sensitive stomachs, and physical reactions to their food. (itchy skin, ear infections, anal gland problems, bladder infections, bladder stones, diarrhea, and seizures) Whether after meals your pet’s rear becomes a noxious weapon of doom, he exhibits diarrhea or vomiting, or appears to have no adverse reactions at all, one thing is certain; a healthy, balanced diet will allow your pet to live a longer, healthier  life and allow for a less toxic living space. Win-win. 

            But where do you start? Well, the phrase “holistic food” gets thrown around a lot, but what does that mean? And how can you be sure it is what you’re getting?

First, a holistic diet for dogs is simply one in which all nutrition requirements are met, in quantities which the body can absorb and utilize. Essentially, holistic foods don’t mess around with extra stuff like dies, animal by-products, or chemical preservatives.  Feeding dogs processed “people food”or allergenic ingredients is not a good choice, because it tends to have items that inflame the body or don’t break down very easily. They either wreak havoc with the digestive system (most notably the pancreas) or get stored as extra weight. Dogs, like people, need six basic nutrient types for energy, proper growth, and overall well-being (no sluggish, depressed mutant puppies for us!). These nutrient classes are proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and water.


This will be the Schwarzenegger portion of your dog’s diet, sans the impressive biceps. As the basic building blocks for cells, tissues, organs, enzymes, hormones and antibodies, proteins are essential for growth, maintenance, reproduction, repair and energy. Proteins can be obtained from a number of sources. Animal-based proteins such as chicken, lamb, turkey, beef, fish and egg have complete amino acid profiles, meaning they contain all of the amino acids (the building blocks for proteins) that your dog needs.


The most concentrated form of food energy, fats provide your pet with more than twice the energy of proteins or carbohydrates. Fats are essential in the structure of cells and are needed for the production of some hormones. They are also required for absorption and utilization of fat-soluble vitamins like vitamins A, D, and E. They are also essential for healthy skin and coat. Essential fatty acids are divided into two groups—Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. Ingredients like chicken fat and sunflower oil are great sources of Omega-6 fatty acids while flax seed, herring oil and salmon oil are key sources of Omega-3 fatty acids. The correct balance of fats can be found in top rated healthy dog food. Because while people come in all shapes and sizes, dogs really should stay dog-shaped, not stumpy and round.


Carbohydrates are a key source of energy for dogs. Whole grains, like whole ground brown rice, and whole ground barley and oats, are all low-fat sources of highly-digestible complex carbohydrates. Whole grains are also a rich source of dietary fiber—both soluble and insoluble—which is crucial for healthy intestinal function (limiting deadly fume emissions). Whole grains are also helpful with the common problem of constipation in dogs, which can be caused by a diet that is lacking in fiber. So basically, the perfect amount of poop.

Vitamins and Chelated Minerals

Vitamins and minerals work together, in conjunction with your pet’s natural enzymes, to help with digestion, reproduction and muscle and bone growth. They are also essential for healthy skin and coat and support immune system health, too.

 Here are some of the key vitamins your pet needs on a daily basis: vitamins A, B12, C, D, and E. A higher-quality dog food contains nutritious fruit and vegetables which provide many key vitamins. For example, peas, potatoes and carrots are great sources of Vitamin A, while blueberries are an excellent source of Vitamin C. Pretty much all the stuff you can’t get your kids to eat, except that they’re mixed with chicken or beef, so your dog is all about it.

Also, the better the food, the more likely it is to contain these minerals: manganese, iron, potassium, copper, and calcium and phosphorus. But, because these minerals are hard for dogs to absorb, it’s important their food be supplemented with “chelated” minerals (which sounds made up, but bear with me…).  A chelated mineral is one that is “attached” to easily absorbable amino acids, which means they will get into your pet’s bloodstream more readily.

Water (Duh)

A vital nutrient, water accounts for between 60 to 70 percent of an adult pet’s body weight. While food may help meet some of your pet’s water needs (dry food has up to 10 percent moisture, while canned food has up to 78 percent moisture), dogs need to have fresh clean water available to them at all times. Water is the medium for all chemical reactions in the body that produce energy. Plus, how else would they manage to pee all over your garden/house/yard?

So how do you know all this is in your dog’s food? Well, it’s a long-held secret: you read the label. Magic, I know.

Conversely, if the label lists any of these products, try and avoid them: chicken or poultry by-product meals, corn, wheat or soy proteins (glutens), and artificial colors, flavors or preservatives. There is a lot of science as to why these items aren’t good for your dog, but the bottom line is they are non-essential and difficult to break down. And they are yucky (mmm, ground, processed chicken feet…).

So, there it is, a quick-and-dirty guide for a happier, healthier pup. Don’t forget though, that like humans, dogs can be born with digestive abnormalities, and can develop allergies. The best way to establish a nutrition plan is to run your research by your local vet.

This article comes from NerdWallet.com, a consumer-focused, data-driven website.

A reader asked me yesterday if I were anti-grain, because in my eBook, “Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet” and in my book, “Dog Dish Diet”, I start with meat and veggies. Many dogs seem to have sensitivities to wheat gluten and that is a known allergen. So I usually avoid wheat and barley until we are sure that they are  comfortable with meat and veggies. Another reason is that many dogs are overweight and don’t need the additional carbohydrate calories in grains.

In the article, the writer comments about “human food” not being as easily digested. Most people assume quality dog food is better for dogs. Raw food and home cooked food are whole food ingredients that are healthy for dogs. I agree with the writer, it is all about ingredients. For example, overweight dogs may not be able to handle the high percentage of carbohydrate in dry commercial foods.

That’s why I wrote Dog Dish Diet and Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet. I want to help you make the right choices in how to feed your pet. No marketing or hype, just common sense.

Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

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Black Friday Coupons Offer Tremendous Savings

True American Dog

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