Playing Catch-Up (+ Holiday Giveaway Winner!)

Hi friends!  It’s been awfully quiet around here this week, partly because I chose to spend a couple of days ‘unplugged’ to hang with my fam for the holidays, and partly because I contracted some sort of seriously nasty stomach virus on Christmas night that left me completely out of commission.  It wasn’t pretty you guys.  I haven’t been that sick in a good ten years (truly), and I spent the majority of my time from Christmas night through last night snuggled up to the toilet, unable to function.  Despite the excessive barfing, I had a really nice holiday, listening to music, watching movies, exchanging gifts (how about those killer Pantone iPhone covers from my husband and mom?!), and laughing over old memories.  And just like every year, I’m a little sad it’s over.

Robbie flew down to Atlanta the day after Christmas for work, and tonight I fly down to meet him.  They are playing four shows for their New Year’s run this year, and although I’m planning on attending the final two, I’ll be spending tonight and tomorrow night in the hotel, playing catch-up with work and sleep.  I’m looking forward to working on a post that will share some highlights from/thoughts on the past year with you guys, so look for that on Monday.  On New Year’s Day (my birthday!), we’ll head back to Chicago to start a brand new year.

And now, it’s time to announce the winner of the Holiday Giveaway!  The winner was chosen via random.org, and that lucky Bubby & Bean reader is…

Congrats Lauren!  You are now the official recipient of a prize package of 6 amazing goodies worth $ 270 from Sew Beastly, Rebecca Murphy, Row House 14, Roots & Feathers, Little Tree, and Bubby & Bean Art!  (Please contact me at bubbyandbean {at} gmail.com so we can discuss getting you your prizes!)

One final thing: if you’d like to be a part of the Bubby & Bean sponsor team for January, there are a couple of small and medium sizes ad spaces remaining, as well as the XL featured spot! You can check out current stats and book your space directly in one click right here, or send an email to bubbyandbean {at} gmail.com before 12/31.

That was a whole lotta stuff crammed into one post, I know.  I wasn’t kidding when I titled it “playing catch-up.”  Evil stomach viruses will cause you to fall all sorts of behind.

I hope you guys had a wonderful holiday week, and that you have something awesomely fun planned for bringing in the new year!

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The truth is out there

I’ve been leaving everyone to their own devices to figure this place out in the week since we’ve moved in. I’ve been too busy unpacking and Christmas-ing and tagine buying to coddle the cohabitants. The cat has figured out where the litterbox is (it took a while), the dogs are learning where they are supposed to sleep, and slowly but surely it is dawning on them that this is their new abode.

There are different sounds to learn, a new territory to navigate. Apollo has to re-learn where the sunny spots are and where I’m keeping the alpaca blanket he likes to snuggle on. For the most part, they’re doing great. The neighbors are quiet as doormice, and no one but us seems to have a dog on the street. It’s us and a bunch of retirees, as far as I can tell. I’m not sure how THEY feel about this clown car moving in, but we like it.

So this is why I was surprised this afternoon when Brody started growling at the back door. Not just a startled growl, but a sustained, there is something nasty I feel the need to warn you about sort of growl.

I let him out, and instead of chasing whatever it was he saw, he just kind of stood there eyeing the back wall (ignore the packing tape on Kekoa’s tail. She was helping me unpack).

Then I saw it. I heard it, actually, before I saw them. UFOs.

Many years ago, when we still had Emmett and Mulan, we lived in this region. So, I was familiar with the evening routine of hot air balloons drifting by. I had forgotten how lovely they were in the sky. I also forgot how much they freak the dogs out.

One time, in our other house, a hot air balloon landed in the field behind our house. It flew directly over us, obscuring the sky with its massive breadth, the WHOOSH WHOOSH of the hot air hitting our ears like an accosting drake come to steal the gold. I have never seen Emmett, a supremely confident dog, tuck tail between legs and bark like that before or since, the merry laughter of the people drifting overhead close enough to hear, bemused at my dog’s abject terror. Granted, it is very loud when the balloon is twenty feet overhead.

They were a bit further away today, fortunately. So Brody was able to quickly determine these ethereal bodies were not a threat, and went back to doing what he normally does, which involves rolling on the grass and scratching his rear.

I can’t look at a hot air balloon without being reminded of Grover the disenchanted disillusioned disgruntled imprisoned Scottish balloon pilot we met in Tanzania. I hope he’s well, where ever he is, which is no longer, I think, Tanzania.

And that where ever he is, he flies a kickass balloon with a big bottle of hot sauce on it (is that what you all see there? I can’t tell.)

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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F365's Top Ten Most Missed Players

F365's Top Ten Most Missed Players
F365 Faves. Mediawatch · Mailbox · F365 Says · John Nicholson · Ref 365 · Spanish Thing · Winners & Losers · Big Weekend · Topical Top 10 · Cheeky Punt · Music 365 · F365 Features · Profile365
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Study: Topical statin use may aid healing in diabetes
The new study found that the topical application of simvastatin accelerated wound healing in genetically diabetic mice. The findings were published in the December issue of The American Journal of Pathology. Though the work was done in mice, the
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Alexander Lukashenko and Vladimir Putin discussed topical issues of
In particular, the presidents discussed the next meeting of the Supreme Council of the Union State of Belarus and Russia. They touched upon issues of economic cooperation. The heads of the states considered another loan tranche of the EurAsEC Anti
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Hip Dysplasia in Pointers


Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large, purebred breeds of dogs such as Pointers.

Pointers make excellent hunting dogs, but around the house they are well-behaved, protective, alert and extremely loyal animals.

A well-trained Pointer will have the best attributes of both a sporting dog and a household companion. They are very intelligent and easily trainable. If you have small children in your family, the Pointer is a good choice for a pet because they are gentle dogs who love playing with children.

The Pointer has a lot of natural energy and needs plenty of room to run around; but also needs daily walks. If you’re a jogger or runner, your Pointer will love the exercise and probably still be going strong when you’re tired out.

The Pointer first appeared as a separate breed in the mid-17th century after breeders crossed Foxhounds, Greyhounds, Setters and Bloodhounds. The resulting mix was the first true “pointer” – a hunting dog that would stop immediately when it spotted game and point its muzzle in the direction of the game.

Pointers have lean, muscular, athletic frames covered in sleek, shiny coats that come in several colors: liver, black, yellow, or orange. Their coats are either solid colored or have white patches. Their heads have long muzzles and jaw-length ears. They have round, watchful eyes in varying shades of brown. Their long necks slope down to narrow shoulders, strong backs and thick tails.

Pointers can live as long as 14 years. Common health issues include skin allergies, epilepsy, and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected. The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

X-ray of a normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

X-ray of an abnormal hip joint:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development. Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Pointers. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Find Out More About Hip Dysplasia

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I'm going to have to reach in and slap the bot…

I'm going to have to reach in and slap the both of them for being so cute!!! LOve this blog, have three pitties myself had four one passed this year @12 :(
Thank you for all the awareness you bring. That's all we can do is keep telling the world that they are AMAZING pets :)
BAD RAP Blog

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Eye To Eye – Mairi and Cy Jack

Topical interview series presented by Catherine Deveney with guests who have dealt with difficult circumstances or extraordinary experiences. In this episode, Mairi and Cy Jack speak of the problems they have endured in trying to have a child, before adopting a Chinese girl.
Video Rating: 0 / 5

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8-Year-Old Girl Raises Money For Dog’s Operation

Kate Jackson of Adopt-A-Golden said, “She had done so much research into the golden retriever breed. It was her idea to start raising money to take care of his operation, so when it came time for Adopt A Golden to look for someone to help with the recovery, we couldn’t think of a better person.”

Itchmo: News For Dogs & Cats

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(No) Fleas Navidog

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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euronews cinema – Les films d’animation en lice pour les Oscars

Les films d’animation sont aussi représentés dans la course aux Oscars, remis dimanche soir à Los Angeles. Grand favori : “Toy Story 3″ des studios Pixar. … fr.euronews.net

Featuring the voice of: LuckyJack020 This co-commentary should be fun. I mean, we’re stealing from the police right off the bat. How much better can you get? –This video was recorded before I got my Happague, so the quality may not be stellar for the first few parts.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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The new large sample bags

When I got home from work Monday, there were four large boxes sitting on my front porch. $ 500 worth of pet products! Three large bags of dry cat food, six cases of canned cat food, one case each of the new canned dog food that Dr. Jane just released, several containers of dog treats, a few bags of cat hairball treats, and most importantly, two four-packs of the new dog and cat sample bags.

Reps recently made the point that multi-pet households really need more than the tiny sample bags that we’ve had. So after a very successful trial run in a few cities, HealthyPetNet released these two and three pound bags. They come with a nice brochure explaining why you want your pet on an all natural food like this.

In the trial, where reps gave out 545 of these larger sample bags, more than half of the recipients became customers one in twelve became reps.

I can tell you, I’m prone to giving away bags of food. I gave away my last bag of dog food a few weeks ago. But out of it, I got an awesome customer who is now ordering dog food and cat food and canned cat food and both cat and dog treats.

So I’m excited to carry both the dog and cat large sample bags in my trunk. I happen to be training with a marathon training team — we raise money for the Leukemia Society to help patients and fund research. (See my fun blog at http://shecanrun.com/)

Lots of runners are dog people and they ALWAYS ask if their pet food is safe. So I’m looking forward to giving away these larger sample bags and finding a lot of new customers!
A day in the life of a HealthyPetNet Rep

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