Topical Hemostatic Products

This video provides information about topical hemostatic agents currently available on the market to promote safe patient outcomes.

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my sweaty self, my gym bag, my cat

One of the things they always tell you in vet school is “don’t go on gut instinct alone.” And this is a good point, because you can’t really practice sound medicine based solely on intuition. You get a hunch, then you follow through with science to prove or disprove your hypothesis.

Most of the time, though, you’re right, even if you don’t want to be. Like the time I was patting Nuke on his side and felt a mass pushing back on my hand. “Splenic hemangiosarcoma,” my mind spit out, and an ultrasound confirmed this.

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As did the fine needle aspirate when Emmett had lymphoma.

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And the radiograph when Kekoa had bone cancer.

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So when I got home from the gym today and Apollo was down in the hind end, dragging his limbs, I didn’t even stop to do a complete exam, never mind jump in the shower or even change. I did enough to know we needed to go stat, and we went straight into the car, my sweaty self, my gym bag, my cat.

So many things pointing to a saddle thrombus, and one thing that didn’t. And because we cling to the one thing that is off, the chance maybe we’re wrong in our suspicions, I decided that I would go from the clinic to the specialty hospital, because we were not sure and I wanted science to disprove my hypothesis, very much. My sweaty self, my gym bag, my cat, zipping along to the next stop.

Saddle thrombus, for those who aren’t aware, is a not-uncommon condition in cats with hyperthroidism and/or cardiac disease. It’s a big blood clot that lodges right in the part of the aorta that splits down each hind leg, and it’s a very, very unpleasant condition. Even more unpleasant than how I must be smelling at this point, which couldn’t have been great. I didn’t care.

The internal medicine specialist, doing what internal medicine specialists do, came up with a nice comprehensive estimate of all the things we could do, anticoagulants and catheters and needles, should our suspicions prove correct. The cardiologist performed an ultrasound, and his heart was definitely enlarged. Apollo’s legs were cold, his pulses nonexistent.

“You can do all these things,” he agreed. “Or not.”

“I’m trying to be realistic about what is going on,” I said. “I’m not wanting to put him through a lot of intensive interventions for another month at home before this happens again.”

The numbers, when you lay them out starkly, aren’t great. “Miracles happen,” the cardiologist said. He saw one, once.

And what I saw was this: my children, crying the next few nights as they wondered if Apollo was going to live. Visits to the hospital, where he stayed, unhappy and scared, with a 50/50 chance of making it out. The kids coming downstairs one morning next month to find him down again, dragging his hind end and yowling. One miracle against this likelihood.

My husband said, “I trust your judgment.”

I tell myself this all the time, and it’s a very personal belief but one I hold strongly: Just because you can doesn’t mean you should. And my gut instinct was telling me loud and clear as a bell: Come home. Your sweaty self, your gym bag, your cat, in the car, home. And it stinks because this is a case where you don’t have the luxury of proving or disproving your hypothesis, because you don’t get to go back in time to redo something if you made the wrong decision. Sometimes gut instinct is all you have.

It’s what also told me “there is no way you can do this yourself, even though you have been doing this professionally for a very long time,” so my friend Dr. Benson kindly agreed on zero notice to come out to my house after the kids said goodbye, and help him cross on over to KevinVille. While I arranged this all and paid for our diagnostics at the hospital, I stood in my ever increasing stinkiness and ugly cried in the lobby. I am an ugly crier. There is nothing to be done about this. And even though I’ve been through it a bajillion times, I still ugly cry because, well, it still sucks every time.

There was a ton of traffic on the way home, my sweaty self, my gym bag, my cat percolating in the car, so I had plenty of time to think back to the lovely 15 years we had together. Apollo outlived Nuke, Callie, Mulan, Emmett, a betta, and a hamster. He was a relic from another era, my first vet school pet. I thought he would live forever.

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He didn’t like being alone, so we got him a buddy. They were inseparable. He has a lot of friends waiting for him tonight in Kevin’s abode.

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We bought that couch in the late 90s. Don’t judge.

He never meowed singly, it was always in threes: meh-eh-eh? The third eh rising like a question, every time.

Are you up?

Got any popcorn?

This lap taken?

I’m so glad superstition did not keep me from adopting him oh so many eons ago. He brought me nothing but good luck, the sweetest cat I ever knew.

My sweet Apollo died today, and I am sad. My sweaty self, my gym bag… an empty pillow.

Meh eh eh? I love you.

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Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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30-day Mission – Doubling my sister’s pet food sales

My sister works three jobs and commutes an hour each way so I have been helping to get her HealthyPetNet business started. Remember, Trilogy/HealthyPetNet is a network marketing business and we are independent reps, not directly employed by the company. You could think of it like some of the cosmetics and kitchen and candle businesses out there.

Val has about 73 customers, some were just samples customers but others have remained quite loyal for the last year and a half. They all came through my various Internet promoting.

She would love to quit one of her jobs and work HealthyPetNet by blogging with me so we have a goal to increase her commission checks to replace one of those part-time jobs this year. For the next 30 days, I simply want to see if we can double her pet food sales. Right now, for the month of December, she has the following sales for herself and throughout her downline:


Considering that an 8-lb bag of dog food retails for about $ 17.26 per bag, and remembering that we set our customers up at the wholesale rates, that’s a lot of dog food sales! And this is about her 20th month and she has never had a “pet party” or anything like that. You get a “quick start” bonus for the very first time a person orders a particular product so that also brings in the checks. So, we like this business!

Tracking what I do and how effective it is could help any of you.

1. My goal every month is to keep her PS (Personal Sales) at least $ 750. That ensures that she gets the maximum commission on her PCS (Personal Commissionable Sales) – 20%. In fact, so that we never accidentally slip under the maximum payout, I’d like to boost her personal sales to $ 2000 per month. That’s very do-able, myself and two of my downline consistently achieve those sales.

I love this about HealthyPetNet commissions. They set a certain amount per individual product that is allotted to commissions, that’s the Personal Commissionable Sale. This helps keep the product affordable for the customer and is a reasonable commission for the rep.

Many of the network marketing companies I’ve seen only pay you if you build equally down two legs (a “binary” system). HealthyPetNet’s commissions are paid on each of your personal customers.

You only need to sell $ 50 per month and that is often what you might buy, yourself, if you are a multi-pet family, so it’s not hard to qualify for commissions. Other network marketing companies require that you personally purchase $ 200 or more in product each month to qualify for commissions, and that you sell a certain amount. That $ 50 for HealthyPetNet doesn’t even need to be your own purchase. In other words, you can work HealthyPetNet even if you don’t ever buy pet food yourself. (I personally think you SHOULD know the products but the point is, this is probably the most comfort-zone-friendly business out there!)

2. At the moment I am not doing anything to boost her downline reps’ sales. When I know that what I do can work for Val, I’ll share with them.

3. So how am I sending customers via the Internet to Val? If you’ll scan through some of my earlier posts this month, you’ll see that I’m registering her website in various online “green” and “healthy pet” directories.

4. I also maintain a very popular Holistic Pet Food Blog — all of the links in that blog go either to Val or to some of my downline, none go directly to me. Folks — Blogging is THE BEST free way to build on the Internet. I can’t wait until Val — who is a professional writer and editor — can do this with me!

5. Since Val has about 73 customers, I sent them all holiday greetings and will send Thank Yous every time they order. Simply improving sales among the existing customers can do a lot to boost Val’s business.

6. Referral business is huge. I also let all of our existing customers know we will give a wholesale discount to any of the friends that they refer to us.

There are a few other things that I’ve done in the past (such as Yahoo and Wiki Answers). One of my very best reps came from a Yahoo Answers discussion. If I do any of those and get results, I’ll post it here.

The take-home message for you is that, If you don’t have a goal and a plan, you can’t achieve it. I’m very excited for that day when Val calls to say to me, I can’t believe the size of the check I just got!

A day in the life of a HealthyPetNet Rep

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Sudden illness from mouse mite

Sudden illness from mouse mite
But what about the black spot that doctors call an eschar and the occasional blisters? Fortunately, the list of pox-like illnesses is short. Namely, chicken pox, which kids get, but the adult version is called shingles, characterized by a large cluster
Read more on Philly.com

Turkey Mites Causing Mighty Pain
Well anyone who's unfortunate enough to walk through can easily pick up dozens and dozens of them, and these turkey mites are holding on for dear life. These tiny creatures can cause some huge itching issues. "Poison ivy, poison oak is nothing compared 
Read more on MyWabashValley

Mite-vectored disease management is goal of AgriLife Research-led team
Dr. Charlie Rush, Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant pathologist in Amarillo, has received a grant that may lead to an integrated management program for all mite-vectored diseases of wheat. The grant is provided through the National Institute of Food
Read more on Southwest Farm Press

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Pet Disaster Relief: How It Works (hint: don’t show up without calling first)

September is National Preparedness Month, according to FEMA. It’s easy to see why. A lot of bad things happen in Mother Nature this time of year; Colorado the latest in a long series of national disasters to catch the eye of the nation. Few images are as evocative as that of a stranded animal, confused, petrified, and facing an uncertain fate while we sit in front of the TV and wonder, is anyone going to help him? How does animal rescue work?

Colorado horse

Katrina

According to Kim Little, my Technical Animal Rescue trainer who taught me in Nicaragua last year, the craziest rescue he ever participated in was a massive pet pot bellied pig stranded in a flooded home during Hurricane Katrina. If you ever meet him someday, ask him about it. Kim’s a pro, active in professional rescue training for decades. The animal rescue component, however, is relatively new.

RescuedCatKatrinaMost anyone who has been active in animal rescue long enough will tell you Katrina was the game changer in disaster response, for many different reasons. It was a mess in general, as we all know, but the animal component was almost nil. People who refused to evacuate because they couldn’t take their pets later required rescue themselves, preferring to risk death than abandon their beloved companion.

A person I met last weekend at my SEMS/ICS disaster response training spoke of a story from Katrina, a little girl who had evacuated with her cat. The cat was with her, safe, and she was told by the bus driver that would take them to safety that pets were not allowed. They must put the carrier down and leave the cat, no, there was nowhere for it to go, and they needed to leave, now. He said he was haunted by the sound of her screams as her bus pulled away, leaving the cat alone in the parking lot as he scrambled to find help.

That was in 2005, and it was awful. In 2006, President Bush signed the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act into law. In a really oversimplified statement, it officially makes pets part of the national disaster response framework. In order for this to really function the way it was intended, though, there needs to be a plan at the local, county, and state levels for pets as well.

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Emergency response trickles up. The National Guard is not called in for a small brush fire in San Diego. However, once that fire spreads beyond what the local fireman can handle, they request aid from the county, then on up to the state, then eventually in huge disasters, a federal level. In order to maintain order and safety in chaos, the manner in which these disasters are managed is consistent across the board: the Incident Command System. ICS provides a standardized response framework that functions the exact same way regardless of whether you’re dealing with a car accident on your street, or a 8.5 earthquake.

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It’s absolutely essential; communications breakdown in a rapidly changing situation can mean disaster. Because the system is standardized and the chain of command well defined, you can drop a fireman from Phoenix into Yosemite and he will know exactly what to do.

But is it the same for animal rescuers?

Pet Disaster Aid: The Government Part

As a vet, I can’t just show up to the flood line and ask if there’s a sick pet I can help. I would probably get myself killed standing around where the helicopter is supposed to land or something. This is why ICS is important, and why emergency management teams ask those who have not been trained not to “self deploy” in emergency situations. I’m minimally trained in disasters; my knowledge is pretty specific to pets. I tried to learn water rescue once; in the practice scenario, I killed myself and the victim I was supposed to be helping. My job became “stay on shore and make sure we have enough rope”, which is also essential and as it turns out something I was great at. To truly be helpful in these situations you need two things: a skill that is useful; knowledge of the command structure and who is going to be in charge of you.

Some of us were better at water rescue than others.

Some of us were better at water rescue than others.

During Hurricane Katrina, there was no one in the official government rescue effort tasked with helping animals. ASPCA and HSUS sent in large scale, well trained relief volunteers, and thank goodness they did because no one else was doing it. But without being part of the official effort, there’s no reimbursement from the government, and more importantly no official way to communicate with the other disaster responders on the ground who may have important information: for example, a person shows up at the Red Cross shelter with a dog; would they even know if/where the emergency shelter is? A fireman doing a swift water rescue on a person realizes the victim is with a horse; who do they call?

With PETS signed into law, states are now working to come up with a clear and well defined animal response plan that integrates into the other structures already in place. On a local level, that means working with animal control and local shelters to provide immediate sheltering and aid. As the situation escalates, larger groups come into play.

In my home state of California, the California Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps- of which I am a member- is the veterinary group that is mobilized on a state level- not until the governor declares a state of emergency. Colorado’s Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps functions similarly, and both are units of the National Medical Reserve Corps. Oversight groups such as PetAid Colorado and CARES in California are tasked with the bigger issue of figuring out how this all should also play out at the local level- all the people in charge before the governor gets involved. As well as pets, they are to come up with plans for all animals: livestock, zoos, farms…. you see how crazy this gets. MASSIVE task.

Private Disaster Aid: So Where is My Money Going?

So hang on, if there’s laws saying the government needs to plan to take care of animals, why are these other groups asking for money? Make no mistake, non-profits/NGOs still have a vital role to play here.

1. There are different type of disaster declarations and not every incident is eligible for state or federal aid. In smaller disasters, the first line of defense is the local community: your local SPCA, shelters, vets, and rescues. Their resources, as you know, are often strained. As a disaster gets larger in scope, their responsibilities only grow.

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Groups like American Humane Association provide invaluable support during disasters

2. An “official” government entity in charge may invite a nonprofit in to help. In Boulder, Animal Control was quickly overwhelmed at the flooding before them. They invited Code 3 Associates and American Humane Association’s Red Star rescue team, both exceptionally well trained animal rescue providers, in to help.

How Can I Help?

1. If you want to know who in Colorado needs help, BlogPaws- itself based in Colorado- has a great article listing local groups in action.

2. If you are a veterinary professional or someone with animal experience and you want to be on call for disasters, try searching “(name of your state) veterinary medical reserve corps”. The ASPCA also has an excellent list of disaster response training courses.

3. If you want to be better prepared for a disaster (and who doesn’t), check out this list of Animal Preparedness Tips from FEMA.

 

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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Sweet English Bulldog Puppy

English Bulldog pup

sweet-english-bulldog

Sweet English Bulldog puppy, isn’t she lovely?

@jmarcoz

aplacetolovedogs on instagram

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A Place to Love Dogs

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Top 6 Flea Markets in Paris

Top 6 Flea Markets in Paris
Referred to affectionately as “Le Puces”, this is easily Paris' most famous flea market and it's widely thought to be the biggest in the world. Based in Clingancourt, Montemarte, it covers 7,000 hectares and sells every item imaginable. Stay at Comfort
Read more on Venere Travel Blog (blog)

Tapioca and the Flea's Transition From Bedroom Project to Break-Out Act
To appreciate the recent rise of Tapioca and the Flea is to recognize the power of persistence and dedication to the idea that a bedroom project is always just a song or two away from blowing up. For Samuel Jacob-Lopez Jr., the lead vocalist and
Read more on OC Weekly (blog)

Couple steal thousands in flea medicine
Store employees at the pet store reported that on Sunday, August 25, a middle aged man and woman of either middle eastern or hispanic descent came into the store at 2057 Telegraph Road, and stole approximately $ 4,000 worth of Frontline Flea and Tick 
Read more on Downtown: Birmingham/Bloomfield news magazine

Kentucky school closed for flea infestation
A school is temporarily closed due to the infestation of fleas on Thursday morning. Southgate Public School will be closed on Thursday and Friday for flea infestation. Superintendent Jim Palm says that the school is closed for the safety of the
Read more on FOX19

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Guess what I gave all my friends with pets?

Treats, of course!

I’m a practical person. My friends and family know this. I give generously but I give what is needed, like, boots for my sister or cute socks for my friend’s daughter. And, I barely paste a bow on the gift! Wrapping is just not my thing.

BUT, what I GIVE is GREAT! Everybody wants to be on my gift list!

My brother has three gorgeous longhaired Himalayans, all over seven years old. He brushes them every night. Skin and coat is very important for these cats, as is hairball control. Did you know that hairballs can become life-threatening in some cats? So they got the gourmet Cat Treats (this is a reformulation of the Hairball treats and it’s much better, if you ask me).
They’re going to swallow hair, that’s a given. You just want to be sure that their fur is strong enough not to just fall out in clumpbs and that they have enough oils in their digestive tract to either barf them up safely or have them pass out safely in the litter box. Hence, the special ingredients in the treats and supplement.
I also brought him a bottle of the new Life’s Abundance Wellness Supplement for Cats. It’s a vitamin so you only let them have 5-7 kibbles. My rescued ferals really love it, I use it to help tame them, so I gave some to him. His kitties wolfed it down! Being older kitties with heavy nutrient needs due to their lavish coats, I think they’ll do really well on this.

Last but not least, he wanted to try the new canned cat food. His kitties have been on the dry Life’s Abundance for the last two years but he, himself, is not a canned cat food person so his kitties never even eat table scraps. But somehow he got into the Christmas spirit and he wanted to give them something special, so I gave him half a case of the Instinctive Choice.
Two of my other kitty friends, Starla and Konnelle, are getting half-cases of Instinctive Choice for their kitties.

Let me just tell you, it’s a big hit!

My friend Natalya at work is a big fan of the porkhide bones and the weight loss food. She has a little Dachsund who just loves those bones. So I gave her a package of the medium size bones with a bow on it! Oh, she was so happy!

Rawhide is nasty, why do pet food manufacturers still sell it? Rawhide is often treated with harsh chemicals like ash-lye and bleach. That just can’t be good for our pets. And it doesn’t dissolve so they can choke on it. Don’t even get me started on the plastic bones — one of my friends had to dig a piece out of his dog’s gums when a piece broke off.

But the pork, while a little pricier, is safer and is digestible, and Natalya’s little guy sure loves them!
I have two other packages of the porkhide bones to give to two other friends who have medium-sized dogs.

I bought several jars of the Wholesome Hearts Baked Treats. These are low-fat and they also contain L-Carnitine so they’re perfect for dogs who need to lose weight. Most of my other dog friends got these.
My trainer at the gym is also my chiropractor. He’s ADORABLE and so are his two little Springer spaniels, so I give treats to his dawgs!! They got a nice jar of Wholesome Hearts this year.
And I will be keeping one of the very large 24 oz jars of treats in my car because when we get into marathon training season, I’ll meet lots of people with dogs and I always like to give them a treat and a drink of water on a hot day!

A day in the life of a HealthyPetNet Rep

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Two Towers Four Paws

A beautiful blog by Teri Modisette

last remaining dogs
Eleven years ago today, the Twin Towers slipped from the sky and plummeted to earth as America watched in shock. As that once beautiful Autumn day wore on to evening, news outlets reported many people still trapped, slowing dying in the avalanche of metal. How did they know? Those people used cell phones to call their families from beneath the remains of the World Trade Center. One by one, they said final goodbyes as the last of their cell phone batteries blinked out.

No one yet knew the death toll would reach nearly 3,000. All the rescue teams could do was send help. That night as pictures and “Please help me find my son” and “Please help me find my daughter” flyers went up around NYC, help arrived at Ground Zero on four legs.
Several sets of four legs, to be exact.
Emergency workers had flooded the area with light, enabling them to pair with public volunteers in a desperate search for the living, but they needed help from something with better hearing and a better sense of smell than the average human being. They were helped by Moxie and Tara from Massachusetts, Guinness from California, Kaiser from Indianapolis, Bretagne from Texas, Red from Maryland, Hoke from Denver. It was a long shot to call in search and rescue dogs. As good as the dogs were, 9/11 was undeniably a large-scale tragedy.
Search-and-rescue dogs are trained to pick up certain scents on the ground and in the air. Well-trained search dogs have proven to be the fastest way to locate a victim in the aftermath of a disaster like an earthquake or hurricane. Disaster search-and-rescue dogs are trained to find people in incredibly unstable environments, where smoke or chemical smells might affect the results of the dog’s search.
Three hundred and eighteen search-and-rescue dogs were trained to find the living who may have survived 9/11. Unfortunately, the terrorist attacks were a true disaster, making it a fruitless search. Despite this, the dogs at Ground Zero were seen doing what dogs do so well– comforting the firemen and first responders during the darkest hours of their lives.
In total, 950 canine dog teams served in response to September 11, 2001. They served at Ground Zero, the Pentagon, and that field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.
Eleven years later, 2 Million Dogs remembers the day our best friends experienced  alongside all in this great nation– and the sweet snuggles and tail wags as our tears rolled down.
We will never forget.
Teri’s blog and all of the blogs posted by her and Erich Trapp can be read at the 2 Million Dogs Blog
——–
YBD’s Notes 1: Thank you, Teri for this beautifully written tribute to the service dogs of 9/11.  
YBD’s Notes 2:  Lest we all forget, dogs are essential to our survival and the very essence of our goodness.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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Tick Tock – short film by Ien Chi

What would you do if you had only five minutes to live? Trace a young man’s few minutes of trying to fulfill his life’s highest potential. please support my …

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