30-day Mission – Doubling my sister’s pet food sales

My sister works three jobs and commutes an hour each way so I have been helping to get her HealthyPetNet business started. Remember, Trilogy/HealthyPetNet is a network marketing business and we are independent reps, not directly employed by the company. You could think of it like some of the cosmetics and kitchen and candle businesses out there.

Val has about 73 customers, some were just samples customers but others have remained quite loyal for the last year and a half. They all came through my various Internet promoting.

She would love to quit one of her jobs and work HealthyPetNet by blogging with me so we have a goal to increase her commission checks to replace one of those part-time jobs this year. For the next 30 days, I simply want to see if we can double her pet food sales. Right now, for the month of December, she has the following sales for herself and throughout her downline:


Considering that an 8-lb bag of dog food retails for about $ 17.26 per bag, and remembering that we set our customers up at the wholesale rates, that’s a lot of dog food sales! And this is about her 20th month and she has never had a “pet party” or anything like that. You get a “quick start” bonus for the very first time a person orders a particular product so that also brings in the checks. So, we like this business!

Tracking what I do and how effective it is could help any of you.

1. My goal every month is to keep her PS (Personal Sales) at least $ 750. That ensures that she gets the maximum commission on her PCS (Personal Commissionable Sales) – 20%. In fact, so that we never accidentally slip under the maximum payout, I’d like to boost her personal sales to $ 2000 per month. That’s very do-able, myself and two of my downline consistently achieve those sales.

I love this about HealthyPetNet commissions. They set a certain amount per individual product that is allotted to commissions, that’s the Personal Commissionable Sale. This helps keep the product affordable for the customer and is a reasonable commission for the rep.

Many of the network marketing companies I’ve seen only pay you if you build equally down two legs (a “binary” system). HealthyPetNet’s commissions are paid on each of your personal customers.

You only need to sell $ 50 per month and that is often what you might buy, yourself, if you are a multi-pet family, so it’s not hard to qualify for commissions. Other network marketing companies require that you personally purchase $ 200 or more in product each month to qualify for commissions, and that you sell a certain amount. That $ 50 for HealthyPetNet doesn’t even need to be your own purchase. In other words, you can work HealthyPetNet even if you don’t ever buy pet food yourself. (I personally think you SHOULD know the products but the point is, this is probably the most comfort-zone-friendly business out there!)

2. At the moment I am not doing anything to boost her downline reps’ sales. When I know that what I do can work for Val, I’ll share with them.

3. So how am I sending customers via the Internet to Val? If you’ll scan through some of my earlier posts this month, you’ll see that I’m registering her website in various online “green” and “healthy pet” directories.

4. I also maintain a very popular Holistic Pet Food Blog — all of the links in that blog go either to Val or to some of my downline, none go directly to me. Folks — Blogging is THE BEST free way to build on the Internet. I can’t wait until Val — who is a professional writer and editor — can do this with me!

5. Since Val has about 73 customers, I sent them all holiday greetings and will send Thank Yous every time they order. Simply improving sales among the existing customers can do a lot to boost Val’s business.

6. Referral business is huge. I also let all of our existing customers know we will give a wholesale discount to any of the friends that they refer to us.

There are a few other things that I’ve done in the past (such as Yahoo and Wiki Answers). One of my very best reps came from a Yahoo Answers discussion. If I do any of those and get results, I’ll post it here.

The take-home message for you is that, If you don’t have a goal and a plan, you can’t achieve it. I’m very excited for that day when Val calls to say to me, I can’t believe the size of the check I just got!

A day in the life of a HealthyPetNet Rep

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sudden illness from mouse mite

Sudden illness from mouse mite
But what about the black spot that doctors call an eschar and the occasional blisters? Fortunately, the list of pox-like illnesses is short. Namely, chicken pox, which kids get, but the adult version is called shingles, characterized by a large cluster
Read more on Philly.com

Turkey Mites Causing Mighty Pain
Well anyone who's unfortunate enough to walk through can easily pick up dozens and dozens of them, and these turkey mites are holding on for dear life. These tiny creatures can cause some huge itching issues. "Poison ivy, poison oak is nothing compared 
Read more on MyWabashValley

Mite-vectored disease management is goal of AgriLife Research-led team
Dr. Charlie Rush, Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant pathologist in Amarillo, has received a grant that may lead to an integrated management program for all mite-vectored diseases of wheat. The grant is provided through the National Institute of Food
Read more on Southwest Farm Press

Posted in Flea Protection Media | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Pet Disaster Relief: How It Works (hint: don’t show up without calling first)

September is National Preparedness Month, according to FEMA. It’s easy to see why. A lot of bad things happen in Mother Nature this time of year; Colorado the latest in a long series of national disasters to catch the eye of the nation. Few images are as evocative as that of a stranded animal, confused, petrified, and facing an uncertain fate while we sit in front of the TV and wonder, is anyone going to help him? How does animal rescue work?

Colorado horse

Katrina

According to Kim Little, my Technical Animal Rescue trainer who taught me in Nicaragua last year, the craziest rescue he ever participated in was a massive pet pot bellied pig stranded in a flooded home during Hurricane Katrina. If you ever meet him someday, ask him about it. Kim’s a pro, active in professional rescue training for decades. The animal rescue component, however, is relatively new.

RescuedCatKatrinaMost anyone who has been active in animal rescue long enough will tell you Katrina was the game changer in disaster response, for many different reasons. It was a mess in general, as we all know, but the animal component was almost nil. People who refused to evacuate because they couldn’t take their pets later required rescue themselves, preferring to risk death than abandon their beloved companion.

A person I met last weekend at my SEMS/ICS disaster response training spoke of a story from Katrina, a little girl who had evacuated with her cat. The cat was with her, safe, and she was told by the bus driver that would take them to safety that pets were not allowed. They must put the carrier down and leave the cat, no, there was nowhere for it to go, and they needed to leave, now. He said he was haunted by the sound of her screams as her bus pulled away, leaving the cat alone in the parking lot as he scrambled to find help.

That was in 2005, and it was awful. In 2006, President Bush signed the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act into law. In a really oversimplified statement, it officially makes pets part of the national disaster response framework. In order for this to really function the way it was intended, though, there needs to be a plan at the local, county, and state levels for pets as well.

ICS

Emergency response trickles up. The National Guard is not called in for a small brush fire in San Diego. However, once that fire spreads beyond what the local fireman can handle, they request aid from the county, then on up to the state, then eventually in huge disasters, a federal level. In order to maintain order and safety in chaos, the manner in which these disasters are managed is consistent across the board: the Incident Command System. ICS provides a standardized response framework that functions the exact same way regardless of whether you’re dealing with a car accident on your street, or a 8.5 earthquake.

ics

It’s absolutely essential; communications breakdown in a rapidly changing situation can mean disaster. Because the system is standardized and the chain of command well defined, you can drop a fireman from Phoenix into Yosemite and he will know exactly what to do.

But is it the same for animal rescuers?

Pet Disaster Aid: The Government Part

As a vet, I can’t just show up to the flood line and ask if there’s a sick pet I can help. I would probably get myself killed standing around where the helicopter is supposed to land or something. This is why ICS is important, and why emergency management teams ask those who have not been trained not to “self deploy” in emergency situations. I’m minimally trained in disasters; my knowledge is pretty specific to pets. I tried to learn water rescue once; in the practice scenario, I killed myself and the victim I was supposed to be helping. My job became “stay on shore and make sure we have enough rope”, which is also essential and as it turns out something I was great at. To truly be helpful in these situations you need two things: a skill that is useful; knowledge of the command structure and who is going to be in charge of you.

Some of us were better at water rescue than others.

Some of us were better at water rescue than others.

During Hurricane Katrina, there was no one in the official government rescue effort tasked with helping animals. ASPCA and HSUS sent in large scale, well trained relief volunteers, and thank goodness they did because no one else was doing it. But without being part of the official effort, there’s no reimbursement from the government, and more importantly no official way to communicate with the other disaster responders on the ground who may have important information: for example, a person shows up at the Red Cross shelter with a dog; would they even know if/where the emergency shelter is? A fireman doing a swift water rescue on a person realizes the victim is with a horse; who do they call?

With PETS signed into law, states are now working to come up with a clear and well defined animal response plan that integrates into the other structures already in place. On a local level, that means working with animal control and local shelters to provide immediate sheltering and aid. As the situation escalates, larger groups come into play.

In my home state of California, the California Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps- of which I am a member- is the veterinary group that is mobilized on a state level- not until the governor declares a state of emergency. Colorado’s Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps functions similarly, and both are units of the National Medical Reserve Corps. Oversight groups such as PetAid Colorado and CARES in California are tasked with the bigger issue of figuring out how this all should also play out at the local level- all the people in charge before the governor gets involved. As well as pets, they are to come up with plans for all animals: livestock, zoos, farms…. you see how crazy this gets. MASSIVE task.

Private Disaster Aid: So Where is My Money Going?

So hang on, if there’s laws saying the government needs to plan to take care of animals, why are these other groups asking for money? Make no mistake, non-profits/NGOs still have a vital role to play here.

1. There are different type of disaster declarations and not every incident is eligible for state or federal aid. In smaller disasters, the first line of defense is the local community: your local SPCA, shelters, vets, and rescues. Their resources, as you know, are often strained. As a disaster gets larger in scope, their responsibilities only grow.

red-star-rescue-rig

Groups like American Humane Association provide invaluable support during disasters

2. An “official” government entity in charge may invite a nonprofit in to help. In Boulder, Animal Control was quickly overwhelmed at the flooding before them. They invited Code 3 Associates and American Humane Association’s Red Star rescue team, both exceptionally well trained animal rescue providers, in to help.

How Can I Help?

1. If you want to know who in Colorado needs help, BlogPaws- itself based in Colorado- has a great article listing local groups in action.

2. If you are a veterinary professional or someone with animal experience and you want to be on call for disasters, try searching “(name of your state) veterinary medical reserve corps”. The ASPCA also has an excellent list of disaster response training courses.

3. If you want to be better prepared for a disaster (and who doesn’t), check out this list of Animal Preparedness Tips from FEMA.

 

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sweet English Bulldog Puppy

English Bulldog pup

sweet-english-bulldog

Sweet English Bulldog puppy, isn’t she lovely?

@jmarcoz

aplacetolovedogs on instagram

The post Sweet English Bulldog Puppy appeared first on A Place to Love Dogs.

A Place to Love Dogs

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Top 6 Flea Markets in Paris

Top 6 Flea Markets in Paris
Referred to affectionately as “Le Puces”, this is easily Paris' most famous flea market and it's widely thought to be the biggest in the world. Based in Clingancourt, Montemarte, it covers 7,000 hectares and sells every item imaginable. Stay at Comfort
Read more on Venere Travel Blog (blog)

Tapioca and the Flea's Transition From Bedroom Project to Break-Out Act
To appreciate the recent rise of Tapioca and the Flea is to recognize the power of persistence and dedication to the idea that a bedroom project is always just a song or two away from blowing up. For Samuel Jacob-Lopez Jr., the lead vocalist and
Read more on OC Weekly (blog)

Couple steal thousands in flea medicine
Store employees at the pet store reported that on Sunday, August 25, a middle aged man and woman of either middle eastern or hispanic descent came into the store at 2057 Telegraph Road, and stole approximately $ 4,000 worth of Frontline Flea and Tick 
Read more on Downtown: Birmingham/Bloomfield news magazine

Kentucky school closed for flea infestation
A school is temporarily closed due to the infestation of fleas on Thursday morning. Southgate Public School will be closed on Thursday and Friday for flea infestation. Superintendent Jim Palm says that the school is closed for the safety of the
Read more on FOX19

Posted in Flea Protection Media | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Guess what I gave all my friends with pets?

Treats, of course!

I’m a practical person. My friends and family know this. I give generously but I give what is needed, like, boots for my sister or cute socks for my friend’s daughter. And, I barely paste a bow on the gift! Wrapping is just not my thing.

BUT, what I GIVE is GREAT! Everybody wants to be on my gift list!

My brother has three gorgeous longhaired Himalayans, all over seven years old. He brushes them every night. Skin and coat is very important for these cats, as is hairball control. Did you know that hairballs can become life-threatening in some cats? So they got the gourmet Cat Treats (this is a reformulation of the Hairball treats and it’s much better, if you ask me).
They’re going to swallow hair, that’s a given. You just want to be sure that their fur is strong enough not to just fall out in clumpbs and that they have enough oils in their digestive tract to either barf them up safely or have them pass out safely in the litter box. Hence, the special ingredients in the treats and supplement.
I also brought him a bottle of the new Life’s Abundance Wellness Supplement for Cats. It’s a vitamin so you only let them have 5-7 kibbles. My rescued ferals really love it, I use it to help tame them, so I gave some to him. His kitties wolfed it down! Being older kitties with heavy nutrient needs due to their lavish coats, I think they’ll do really well on this.

Last but not least, he wanted to try the new canned cat food. His kitties have been on the dry Life’s Abundance for the last two years but he, himself, is not a canned cat food person so his kitties never even eat table scraps. But somehow he got into the Christmas spirit and he wanted to give them something special, so I gave him half a case of the Instinctive Choice.
Two of my other kitty friends, Starla and Konnelle, are getting half-cases of Instinctive Choice for their kitties.

Let me just tell you, it’s a big hit!

My friend Natalya at work is a big fan of the porkhide bones and the weight loss food. She has a little Dachsund who just loves those bones. So I gave her a package of the medium size bones with a bow on it! Oh, she was so happy!

Rawhide is nasty, why do pet food manufacturers still sell it? Rawhide is often treated with harsh chemicals like ash-lye and bleach. That just can’t be good for our pets. And it doesn’t dissolve so they can choke on it. Don’t even get me started on the plastic bones — one of my friends had to dig a piece out of his dog’s gums when a piece broke off.

But the pork, while a little pricier, is safer and is digestible, and Natalya’s little guy sure loves them!
I have two other packages of the porkhide bones to give to two other friends who have medium-sized dogs.

I bought several jars of the Wholesome Hearts Baked Treats. These are low-fat and they also contain L-Carnitine so they’re perfect for dogs who need to lose weight. Most of my other dog friends got these.
My trainer at the gym is also my chiropractor. He’s ADORABLE and so are his two little Springer spaniels, so I give treats to his dawgs!! They got a nice jar of Wholesome Hearts this year.
And I will be keeping one of the very large 24 oz jars of treats in my car because when we get into marathon training season, I’ll meet lots of people with dogs and I always like to give them a treat and a drink of water on a hot day!

A day in the life of a HealthyPetNet Rep

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Two Towers Four Paws

A beautiful blog by Teri Modisette

last remaining dogs
Eleven years ago today, the Twin Towers slipped from the sky and plummeted to earth as America watched in shock. As that once beautiful Autumn day wore on to evening, news outlets reported many people still trapped, slowing dying in the avalanche of metal. How did they know? Those people used cell phones to call their families from beneath the remains of the World Trade Center. One by one, they said final goodbyes as the last of their cell phone batteries blinked out.

No one yet knew the death toll would reach nearly 3,000. All the rescue teams could do was send help. That night as pictures and “Please help me find my son” and “Please help me find my daughter” flyers went up around NYC, help arrived at Ground Zero on four legs.
Several sets of four legs, to be exact.
Emergency workers had flooded the area with light, enabling them to pair with public volunteers in a desperate search for the living, but they needed help from something with better hearing and a better sense of smell than the average human being. They were helped by Moxie and Tara from Massachusetts, Guinness from California, Kaiser from Indianapolis, Bretagne from Texas, Red from Maryland, Hoke from Denver. It was a long shot to call in search and rescue dogs. As good as the dogs were, 9/11 was undeniably a large-scale tragedy.
Search-and-rescue dogs are trained to pick up certain scents on the ground and in the air. Well-trained search dogs have proven to be the fastest way to locate a victim in the aftermath of a disaster like an earthquake or hurricane. Disaster search-and-rescue dogs are trained to find people in incredibly unstable environments, where smoke or chemical smells might affect the results of the dog’s search.
Three hundred and eighteen search-and-rescue dogs were trained to find the living who may have survived 9/11. Unfortunately, the terrorist attacks were a true disaster, making it a fruitless search. Despite this, the dogs at Ground Zero were seen doing what dogs do so well– comforting the firemen and first responders during the darkest hours of their lives.
In total, 950 canine dog teams served in response to September 11, 2001. They served at Ground Zero, the Pentagon, and that field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.
Eleven years later, 2 Million Dogs remembers the day our best friends experienced  alongside all in this great nation– and the sweet snuggles and tail wags as our tears rolled down.
We will never forget.
Teri’s blog and all of the blogs posted by her and Erich Trapp can be read at the 2 Million Dogs Blog
——–
YBD’s Notes 1: Thank you, Teri for this beautifully written tribute to the service dogs of 9/11.  
YBD’s Notes 2:  Lest we all forget, dogs are essential to our survival and the very essence of our goodness.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Tick Tock – short film by Ien Chi

What would you do if you had only five minutes to live? Trace a young man’s few minutes of trying to fulfill his life’s highest potential. please support my …

Posted in Flea Protection Media | Tagged , , , | 25 Comments

The strange twisted story of canine circovirus

You have probably been hearing a lot about canine circovirus. So have I. You may have heard some conflicting things about this virus. So have I. Because I love you all and I want you to know what I know, I’ve spent the day trying to make sense of the information that’s out there. Here’s what I know so far and why I’m not recommending mass panic at this time.

Part 1: It’s the food

Here’s how the story evolved, as far as I can piece together.

1. In mid-August, P&G pet foods issues a voluntary recall of certain lots of dry food manufactured at an East Coast plant over a 10 day period because of the possibility of Salmonella.

2. Last week, The Pet Spot, a pet kennel in Ohio, learns that several dogs who had been at the facility in the last few weeks had become sickened with a severe hemorrhagic gastroenteritis/ vasculitis type disease. Three of those dogs died.

3. The kennel owner, trying to figure out what was going on, noted that his kennel’s stock food is Iams. He makes a “hey, we may want to look into this” sort of statement which gets digested, churned up in the bowels of social media and local media, and becomes

OMG EUKANUBA IS KILLING DOGS AGAIN (CHAOS/PITCHFORKS)

mob

The only problem is, it wasn’t. By this time, P&G- which coincidentally is headquartered in Ohio- hears this story and of course they would like to know what happened to those dogs. I spoke with Jason Taylor over at P&G, who among many duties has the awesomely fun job of managing pet food recalls when and if they occur, to ask what happened next.

According to Taylor, despite the fact that the kennel owner did not have the lot codes of the food he was using, P&G was able to ascertain the lot numbers based on order history and shipping details, determining that the food being fed at the kennel was not part of the recall, and in fact was not even manufactured at the same factory.

But since they were there anyway with a group of microbiologists and toxicity experts and a small business owner who was under a lot of pressure to figure out what was going on, they figured they would add their resources to the investigation, crawling around with cotton swabs and all that science-y stuff and send it off to see if there was any identifiable pathogen in the environment. There was none. The facility was cleared to re-open.

Still with me?

Part 2: It’s circovirus

4. By now, the state veterinarian, the local veterinary community, and the Ohio State veterinary hospital are involved. People put their heads together. Someone says, “hey, I remember reading about a dog in California that died this April with similar symptoms; he had circovirus, which is weird and unusual because it’s normally a pig disease. We should test for that too.” The news, already paying attention after losing the whole pet food angle, is still interested. Under the tender editorial guidance of a click-happy news site, “we are investigating this possibility” becomes:

OMG A SCARY NEW VIRUS WILL KILL YOUR DOG

because if there’s one thing the spell check challenged online journalism teams at local newspapers like to do, it’s to drive traffic with leads like “It’s a scary new disease, that can kill your dog” then follow up with some man-on-the street interviews with statements such as “It can like, kill your dog, and that’s like bad for them.”

hazmat4

Uh oh.

As anyone who has read any sort of newspaper or watched any news channel in the last decade will attest to, journalism has become less about accurate reporting and more about fast reporting. It’s the nature of the beast these days, but it’s why everything needs to be taken with a grain or bushel of salt because guess what?

According to a UC Davis professor who tested samples from three of the affected dogs, only one tested positive for circovirus. You may not have heard that yet because Ohio can’t test for circovirus; samples got sent to California and despite what CSI tells us, results are not instantaneous. It took this long for the official results to come in, which is about 4 days too slow for a news cycle that is moving on to the next disaster at midnight.

Part 3: It’s…a case in progress

So what do we know about circovirus and dogs, exactly? Not much. What caused these illnesses? Not sure.

  • Correlation does not imply causation. In the above referenced piece, Dr. Pesavento points to an academic article published in April that  talks about the dog in California, then went looking for the presence of circovirus in other dogs. To sum up, it was found in some dogs with diarrhea. It was also found in some healthy dogs. Most of the sick dogs were co-infected with some other pathogen as well. Clear as mud.

So again, what do we know about circovirus in dogs? That it exists. It may or may not cause disease. That is all the scientists are willing to say at the moment. Wordier summary is in the Ohio Department of Agriculture press release.

That is soooo anticlimactic and unsexy and un-newsworthy, and as a person who likes exciting news as much as the next person I wish I had something more earth-shattering to report. But at the end of the day I am also a person that likes TL:DR summaries, so to put it all in one handy image:

circotagion

Part 4: So now we torch the dog park, right?

I in no way want to minimize what happened to those affected dogs, who suffered from a rapid onset, devastating illness. It is entirely possible that circovirus will be identified as the cause, and in that case we can revisit this issue and talk more. I as much as anyone else hope the patient scientists who make this their life’s work will be rewarded for their diligence with a definitive cause. As of now, there is none. We live such stressful lives as it is, I like to wait until I’m forced to panic so I don’t spend my entire life wedged in the corner covered in Saran Wrap. While we wait to determine if this is necessary, here’s what you can do:

1. Remember the number of reported cases stands at ‘miniscule’. If you’re worrying about circovirus while your dog is running around a year late on his parvo booster, I would recommend re-focusing your attention, at least for the time being. That being said:

2. Call the vet immediately if your dog shows any signs of this disease. If your dog has bloody diarrhea, you should be at the vet ASAP anyway; this advice has not changed since before this virus emerged. The affected pets became rapidly, severely ill: rapid treatment was essential to positive outcome.

3. Avoid high risk environments. Consider the fact that all of the reported cases happened in dogs that had recently been to kennels or doggie daycares. High concentration of dogs in one place means higher likelihood of disease spread.  I actually don’t recommend carte blanche avoiding these environments, but if you are really concerned or if your dog has a less than hardy immune system, dogs survive just fine without those facilities.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Left to my Own Devices

Marlin’s been working out of town a lot since the flooding a few months back so I’ve been left home alone to work and look after the pups… and to shop online.  :)

Not too long ago I became obsessed with dog activity tracking devices.  I blame Pack and the newsletter I write for them. The newsletter makes me browse the internet to find cool stuff for dogs and it seems to result in me buying stuff.  :)

Anyway, a few weeks back I mentioned activity tracking devices in the newsletter.  There are quite a few out there and they all look pretty cool. Some have GPS so if your dog accidentally gets out of the yard, you can track them and find them again (this only works in the states at the moment – something to do with cell phone carriers).  These also tend to have monthly fees that I didn’t like.  Then there are ones that only track their activities but not their location – like FitBark and Whistle.

I figured a device like this would be great at tracking my dogs’ activities as they age.  I think some times changes are so gradual you don’t really see them but these devices would help you see things in black and white.  I also thought they would be good at tracking how much is too much, and how much is too little, when Coulee’s feet aren’t doing so well.

And well… I like gadgets.  Gadgets are fun.  So I decided to back FitBark on Kickstarter.  It was my first Kickstarter “investment”.  To be honest, if I had discovered Whistle before I had done the Kickstarter, I probably would have gotten that one – I like stuff to arrive NOW, not later, although I’m trying to be patient. :)

As I browsed the internet looking at reviews of these different gadgets it was impossible not to stumble across similar gadgets for people and I managed to talk myself into one of those as well.  (Too much time home alone is never a good thing!).  I’ve signed up for an exercise program starting in September and I decided it would be cool to see what my activity levels were like before, during and after the program.

Earlier this week I received my FitBit Flex.  At first I was just going to track my activities but then I decided I wanted to see how easy it was to track what I was eating too.  So far, I’ve done a good job of not eating more calories than I’ve burned but I’m eating too much to reach my “weight loss goal” that it helped me set.  It has definitely helped me decide to pass up desert or an evening drink that I don’t need though. :)  It is also making it extra clear (I already knew this) that if I could stop drinking Chai Tea Lattes, I’d have lots of extra calories to “spend” somewhere else.

The activity information above is from yesterday.  It is a pretty typical work day, minus a dog walk. (Coulee’s limping at the moment but we are going to see a rehab vet today to hopefully get that all straightened out). I worked a split shift and was off between 10 and 1… which is obvious by the lack of movement during those times.  :)

It also tracks my sleep but it pretty much told me what I already knew – I wake up a few times each night.  It’s funny to see the consistency.  Something happens at 1 a.m. each night to wake me up. I don’t remember Coulee barking at the train this past week, but maybe she has been.

I will try not to become an exercised obsessed, food tracking fiend – at least online. ;) I’m excited and scared for the exercise program to start in September.  Because of my work shift (and the lack of showers at the facility) I had to sign up for the 5 a.m. class.  UGH.  There were so many class options but that was the only one that worked for me other than the 7 p.m. one. By the end of the day, the last thing I want to do is exercise so a morning class was better.  I just wish it didn’t have to be quite so early!
Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , | Leave a comment