Foot Wax, Proper Care of Pads Makes Winter Easier on Dogs

Walking Kia around the neighborhood track was always a joy. We followed the same course each day and she was a happy chow mix – until the day she stopped mid walk and began whining and crying, She held her paws up and would not continue walking. At first glance, I saw no cuts or injury. But after removing my gloves and inspecting closer, I noticed ice had formed on the hair between her toes and was causing her pain. I rubbed her feet until they thawed and we headed back home.snow-dog

This winter much of the country has been experiencing record cold temperatures and snowfall. Many areas have seen temperatures drop to below zero with windchills at -25 to -40 degrees. This cold temperature is a danger to dogs and dog walkers.

Protecting a dog’s paws is essential in these conditions.

We all know that street salt can burn a dog’s pads and cause extreme pain. While pet-safe salt might be used on the driveway at a pet’s home, it can be hard to avoid on the street. When returning from a walk, sitters should thoroughly wash and dry a dog’s feet to remove the salt – protecting the paws and preventing the pet from licking and ingesting the salt.

A good solution to protect dog’s feet is to coat them with a paw wax in advance. The wax – similar to a petroleum jelly is a natural solution to keep dog paws soft and free of pain. There are several brands known as musher’s wax – invented for sled dogs in Canada.

Friends and customer’s introduced to the wax this year, report great success.

One customer reported having a problem this year because her dog Ellie was extremely sensitive to rock salt. Ellie was in pain on walks and didn’t want to go out.

“The Musher’s salve is fantastic!”  she reports. “Works wonders. Is made of all natural wax. No need to wash it off; just wipe with a soft cloth. Ellie went nuts, ran like crazy and pooped a ton.”dog(1)

Another customer, with a chihuahua found her pet did not want to go out this winter, until she started applying wax to her feet.

“It seems to help Poppins a lot. If I forget to put it on her, she starts to limp right away. If it is on, she leaps around and wants to stay out longer!” she said.

Dogs with longer hair between their toes, like Kia, should be groomed so the hair is clipped short to prevent ice build-up in this sensitive area.

The hair on feet should be kept even with the pads. Avoid cutting it too short or the fur won’t offer protection from the snow. To avoid trimming out too much hair, keep your scissors even with your dog’s pads and cut the hair that sticks out.


PetsitUSA Blog

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Blu, the Clumber Spaniel

This beautiful Clumber Spaniel was walking through Menton’s market with his owners. He lives in Menton and is a showdog – his next show will be in Monaco the first weekend of May.  Blue is just over two years old.

RIVIERA DOGS

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RANT!!! Lice On My Aliexpress Hair!?!? NO Ma’am

Open Me Im Filled With Answers ♥ Watch In HD!!! *****For Business Partnerships, Product Reviews, And Sponsorships Please Contact Me at My ONLY email Dazzle…

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Today’s Walk

This pretty much sums things up.

Coulee found a ball so she kept dropping it at my feet and stared happily at me waiting for the throw.

It doesn’t matter if the throw never comes. She never loses her optimism.

And Lacey brought us dead body parts. This was a nice little bit of deer she decided to bring me.  I keep asking for flowers (heck I’d be happy with twigs!), but she never seems to listen.  ;)

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Couch Potato

I’m not sure what is up with the frisbee… I have a feeling Coulee put it there.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Latest Mite News

Hibiscus erineum mite
Mite

Image by Scot Nelson
Hibiscus erineum mite damage to hibiscus foliage in Kainaliu, Hawaii.

Marine served during Cuban Missile Crisis
Three engineers were out in the minefield and we had a gunnery sergeant who was assigned to us who jumped into a Mighty Mite. I didn't see any enemy fire though. These were all friendly incidents. One good thing I remember happened was on Oct 26, …
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Bees go under the hammer on the coast
THe plight of the humble honeybee is a tale of disease, mites and poor weather but enthusiasm for beekeeping in Yorkshire has boomed as more people have become concerned about their decline. Seizing the moment, funding of £1.3m has today been …
Read more on Yorkshire Post

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WALK 2: Fluid Dynamics

Now that we’re out of the forest and training on the Memphis Greenline, our focus this week has shifted towards pacing.  So why is that important?  
With my average stride, I can walk 3.5 to 3.75 miles per hour bearing weight, a fairly fast pace for the fuzzybutts… almost a trot for them really.  But one of the rules of the road is one must walk their walk.  Which basically means, you must abide by nature’s design of you.  
So since I cannot quicken nor slow my pace for extended periods, nor they, me, most of our training comes down to figuring out how a Man-Pyr (that’s YBD), a French poet and existentialist (that’s Hudson), and a Moose (that’s, well, Moosey) reach a rhythm on the road.  
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The Problem is Pyrs

I always thought it was god’s greatest joke on me that I choose to go on great journeys with one the most notoriously “independent” breeds. That’s how wonderful rescues like the  National Great Pyrenees Rescue characterizes them anyway.  I have my own sobriquet for Pyrs, crasser and truer to my southern roots, and one that could and should equally apply to me, too.      
Such as it is, pacing is a partnership and that’s why it’s of paramount importance at this stage of training.  
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A Matter of Metrics
To attain our 25 week West Coast Walk, we must average a little over 12 miles per day. From our work last week and this, I now know that 6 miles per two hours is a comfortable pace for us.  That includes a 15-20 minute break halfway and a few ‘stop and sniffs’.  
But with a laggard and a leader… I’ll let you guess which is which… the science isn’t always that exact.  
A partnership presupposes many things, but what’s most important to its success is fluidity and I feel like Hudson-Indiana-Luke, our little Industrial Puppy Complex is making great strides towards…
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Yer Big Dog’s (YBD’s) Notes 1:  I am pleased with our progress and preparation over these past few weeks, although we’ve had a few hiccups throughout… More on that later.

YBD’s Notes 2:  This week is gear training and filming the Trailer.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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New Study Links Owner’s Scent to Pleasure Center in a Dog’s Brain

National Geographic is reporting on a recently completed study from Emory University that uses magnetic resonance imaging to see what areas of a dog’s brain are activated by various scents. Study author Gregory Berns’ first task was to teach 12 dogs to sit still long enough to be scanned by a functional MRI machine. Then, […]


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Cool Dog images

Some cool Dog images:

Dog balancing on stand.
Dog

Image by Boston Public Library
File name: 08_06_000905

Title: Dog balancing on stand.

Creator/Contributor: Jones, Leslie, 1886-1967 (photographer)

Date created: 1917 – 1934 (approximate)

Physical description: 1 negative : glass, black & white ; 4 x 5 in.

Genre: Glass negatives

Subjects: Dogs

Notes: Title from information provided by Leslie Jones or the Boston Public Library on the negative or negative sleeve.; Date supplied by cataloger.

Collection: Leslie Jones Collection

Location: Boston Public Library, Print Department

Rights: Copyright © Leslie Jones.

Preferred citation: Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection.

Dog Fight!
Dog

Image by Cynr
Nate’s Point Dog Park Balboa Park Feb 2014

Dog Noses
Dog

Image by pixeljones
- For Interesting… Again! group -

Recurring theme: In-your-face dog noses the size of a Buick.

Why: Dogs are all nose to begin with. Why not shove a wide-angle lens up there and make them even more so? It’s the doggiest.

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Feb 25, Is there Really More to Love or Just Less Time….. ?

Veterinarians warn about dogs slipping into the fleshy grip of the obesity epidemic, much like their owners. About 30% of the dog population is overweight. Fat dogs may suffer obesity-related diseases such as heart and circulatory diseases, joint problems and diabetes. Fat dogs are also more prone to respiratory problems, cancer, reproductive disorders and suffer a decreased quality of life. Overweight dogs need to be rehabilitated by: less calories from food and more exercise. It is that simple! A quick test for you to check upon your dog’s weight status is that it should be easy to feel the ribs and there should be no fat hanging from its abdomen.
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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