This is a great story! Full of great information. …

This is a great story! Full of great information. My pit bull has always been good with cats. He even snuggles with my parents cats lol. I'm glad your pitty Was able to get used to the cats. I love happy endings! Especially when pit bulls are involved! Keep spreading the good word of pit bulls!
BAD RAP Blog

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Year in Review: Sports Stars to The Rescue 2017

As we get ready to embark on 2018 let’s give a cheer for stars of the sports world whose efforts to help paws causes in 2017 were real game changers for dogs and cats in need! Baseball Helping…



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DogTipper

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A Walmart parking lot is not the place to commit a crime

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Year in Review: Fashion World to the Rescue 2017

Before we embark on a new year, let’s take a look back at some of the many supermodels, designers, fashion houses and couture-conscious canines who showed the world in 2017 that compassion is…



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DogTipper

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Happiest Holidays! (+ Taking A Break)

Happy Holidays from Bubby and Bean!

Happy holidays, friends! The past couple of months have admittedly been a blur, filled with a whole lot of extra work hours, house buying stuff (we close the week after next!), and general holiday craziness. Robbie leaves the day after Christmas for the band’s New Year’s run and I haven’t even started wrapping gifts (or packing our house up), which is so ridiculous it’s comical. This is actually the first time ever that I was finished shopping an entire week before Christmas, but aside from that, I’m a hot holiday mess. We also have Essley’s birthday on the 28th, mine on January 1st, and Emmett’s on January 9th. It’s a very busy time around here (as I’m sure it is for you as well!), but as long as we stay heathy this year (because last year we sure didn’t), I’m fine with that. Busy holiday seasons are the best, honestly.

Essley’s excitement level about Christmas day is off the charts. Emmett doesn’t quite get it yet, but he knows that Santa is coming. I have always loved the holiday season, but having these too has made my affinity increase exponentially. I cannot wait to see their faces when they wake up on the 25th.

I will be taking my annual break from the blog to spend time with my family and catch up on non-work things, starting today. I’ll be stopping in next week for a post, but we won’t officially be back until after the New Year. I’m sure I’ll still be active on Instagram (because I’m sure I’d, like, combust if I wasn’t on social media for an entire, like, 10 days), so in the meantime, you can come hang with me over there.  

However you celebrate (or don’t celebrate!), and whatever your plans may be, I wish you the happiest of holidays!

P.S.  If you are doing any very last minute shopping for your little ones, we got our kids several wonderful items from this roundup of kids’ holiday gifts that make a difference in the world.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Don’t Miss the Lucy Pet Products Paws for Life Parade Float!

New Year’s Day is just around the corner. If your resolution for 2018 is to be the change you want to see in the world, you’ll find motivation for your mission in every “Making a…



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DogTipper

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What Should a Dog Eat?

What should a dog eat and how do you know if you’re giving your pet the best diet possible? There are so many different types of diets available for dogs today – dry food, canned food, raw meats, cooked meats, turkey, vegetables, and specialty blends.

The diet that you feed your dog will have an effect on its physical health, …
Dog’sHealth.com Blog

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Removing Ticks From Dogs

Removing ticks from your dog should be a priority as soon as you notice even one tick appearing on your dog’s skin. Many ticks can carry serious diseases like Lyme’s Disease.

The types of environments where ticks are usually found are places with thick vegetation, in tall grasses, bushes, and heavy brush in the woods where ticks have a lot …
Dog’sHealth.com Blog

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Dog Predicts Owner’s Pregnancy

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Hunting Reeves’s Muntjac in England

Reeves’s muntjac is native to China and Taiwan. It is not native any place in Europe, but one of the places where it has been introduced is England. The epicenter of their population in that country is Bedfordshire, where this hunt takes place.  The Dukes of Bedford were into promoting deer on their estate, Woburn Abbey, and they were instrumental in saving the Pere David’s deer from extinction. One suggestion is that the muntjac in England derived from Reeves’s muntjac that escaped Woburn Abbey, but they also could have derived from escapees from the Whipsnade Zoo.

Whatever their origin, Reeves’s muntjac have established themselves a long way from their native territory, and they do quite a bit of damage to trees.

And what usually happens is that people are encouraged to hunt the invasives, but as you can see from the selective shooting that goes on this video, the species is now being managed as a sort of game species on many estates. This development should be of no surprise, and it should be noted that island of Great Britain has only two native deer species, the red and the roe. The very common fallow deer was introduced by the Romans and then again the Normans from the European continent.

But the fallow deer is essentially managed as a native game species. The exact same thing is done with Sika deer that have been introduced to Maryland. White-tailed deer are treated the same way in the Czech Republic, as are all the deer that have been introduced to New Zealand.

Whatever their treatment as a game or invasive species, this video does provide a nice closeup of the male Reeves’s muntjac as a specimen. Of particular note are the tusks, which they use for fighting and display.  It is mentioned in this clip that they are “musk deer, ” but this is in error.

This error comes from the tusks that both muntjac and musk deer possess, but musk deer are placed in their own family (Moschidae).  True deer are Cervidae, and all the muntjac species are true deer that fall into the Cervinae subfamily (which includes red deer, fallow deer, and North American elk).  However, they are primitive Cervinae.

Musk deer differ in some morphological characters from true deer in that they don’t have facial glands, possess only a single pair of teats, and have a gallbladder.  They also never have antlers, and all species possess a scent gland on their tail.

The common ancestor of musk and true deer, though, had prominent tusks. The modern muntjac species is unique in that it still has those fangs of the earliest Cervinae.

The other true deer that is known for its tusks is the Asian water deer, which was definitely introduced to Britain thanks to escapees from Woburn Abbey. But it is not closely related to the muntjac at all.

It is also not a musk deer, even though it has much more prominent tusks than the muntjac and never has antlers. Instead, it fits within Capreolinae, the subfamily of deer that includes roe deer, moose, reindeer/caribou, and all the New World deer but the wapiti. Its prominent tusks and lack of antlers are a also primitive trait in this lineage of deer.

That muntjac and water deer are both fanged shows that more primitive animals will resemble each other more the derived forms of their respective lineages.

These cnine teeth are celebrated in North America elk lore. Their “ivory” is taken as almost as much a trophy as the antlers, and indigenous people in Canada and the US used them as jewelry. They aren’t sharp daggers like those found on muntjac and water deer, though. They are just vestigial teeth that show that the ancestor of the great bugling bull were once little fanged creatures.

These upper canines also appear in white-tailed deer on occasion as an atavism.

Beyond these little fangs, North American deer lack these primitive traits, so I find fangs on these Asian species totally fascinating.

They are windows into the past, when deer were just little beasts of the undergrowth.


Natural History

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