9 Beautiful (and Practical) Baskets

9 Beautiful (and Practical) Baskets

Hi hi hi! The blog has been noticeably vacant recently compared to normal, I know. The truth is that I have been spending much more time creating content on Instagram lately, and while the Bubby and Bean blog will always be my social media mother ship, I get so much more engagement and traffic on IG these days. So if you don’t yet, please give a follow over there so you’re not missing out on content. And if you prefer to read here, let me know in the comments. People don’t comment on blogs anymore like they do on Instagram, but it’s still always nice to feel like there’s a conversation going on here as well, and I’m not just talking to into an abyss. :) Don’t worry, the blog isn’t going anywhere. We’re on our ninth year and regardless of social media shifts, our plan is to continue to create content here for years to come. And there is lots of great stuff planned here this month, so make sure to visit often.

Now that that’s out of the way, how about those pretty baskets up above? We are verrrry slowly but surely starting to get our house where we want it, room by room. (Don’t even get me started on the kitchen though. Anybody want to come just demo it for us and start all over?) But even the finished rooms could use some organization, so I’m in the market for some beautiful baskets that can hold random trinkets and also act as room accessories. I’m a big fan of all these you see here, but terrible at making decisions. Which ones get your vote?

More to come!

ALSO FIND US HERE: INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

訴訟・告訴について思うこと

調べ物を進めていくと、人は悪いうわさを流すのが好きだなあ、と思うことがあります。
私は今美容整形をしようとしていて、そのためにいろいろと知識を吸収しようとしているところです。
だから美容外科についての情報を調べているのですが、今日は訴訟、告訴という言葉に行き当たりました。
訴訟、告訴、どちらも普段過ごす上ではあまり耳にすることのない言葉ですね。
正確には、耳にすることは多いけれど自分とは直接関係がないことがほとんどの言葉です。
私も今回、自分が受けることを考えている類の手術に関して告訴、訴訟といった言葉を目にして驚いたほどです。

自分の責任で行うはずの美容整形なのに、結果が不服だからと訴訟だ告訴だと言ってしまうのはどうなのでしょうか。
少なくとも、私はそうはならないだろうなと感じました。
私は先日、品川美容外科でカウンセリングを受けてきました。
手術の前に、どういった内容で手術を行うのかという相談をしたのです。
今回、たるみ始めた頬なども気になってはいたものの、それより先にしわをどうにかしたいと思いしわ取りをお願いしました。
先生は私が特にどこをきれいにしたい、と主張するのを聞いてくれ、その上で全体のバランスからどこのしわをどのくらい取るのがいい、という話をしてくださいました。
1ヶ所のしわを取りすぎてしまうと不自然になってしまうので、全体をバランスよく、かつ私が一番気にしている部分が取りすぎて目立つことがないように、綿密に治療計画を立ててくださったので私もかなり安心してお話を聞くことができました。
症例写真も見せてもらえ、どこに何を注射するとこうなるか、ということをわかりやすく説明してくださったのは、私にとっては嬉しい事でした。

品川美容外科クリニックのホームページでは各施術について説明とともに副作用が表記されています。
あらかじめ品川美容外科クリニックのホームページを確認していたので施術後に副作用があることを知っていましたが、施術をする前も副作用についても詳しい説明があったため、不安になるより、むしろ心構えをして施術にのぞめるのではないかと思いました。

注射程度の軽い整形とは言っても未経験のことですし、私は元々納得のいく説明を求めてしまう質です。
そういう意味では、私と品川美容外科の相性はとてもよかったと言えるのではないでしょうか。

これまで調べていった中で裁判を行ったケースもあり、改めて手術に対する意識を深めました。
裁判にまで発展したものを調査してみると、事前に施術内容や効果の説明を怠っていたかどうかが焦点になっている事例が多くありました。その責任を裁判で明らかにするというものです。
手術自体が失敗したのならともかく、きちんと自分の納得するまで説明を受けていないのなら自己責任と言われてしまってもしょうがないのかもしれません。
裁判をするのにも時間とお金がかかりますので、私が品川美容外科で納得のいくまで説明を聞いたように、しっかりと説明を聞いて信頼できる美容外科で手術を受けることをおすすめします。

FunnyDogsVideos.com

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged | Leave a comment

Our Bohemian Inspired Outdoor Living Space

I feel like I’m cheating a little with this post, since I shared our patio reveal (and most of these pictures) about a year ago, right after our patio was complete. But we’ve started to get it set up again for the season, and that makes me so happy that I just felt compelled to share it again.

It’s been many years since I actually had a backyard, and for a long time I dreamt of having a space that felt like an oasis. I envisioned something colorful (which is normally not my aesthetic at all) with a strong boho vibe. When we moved into our house last year, our backyard started off with nothing in it at all except a concrete step leading out to it. It was a mess, and I couldn’t wait to get started. First my husband and I designed a poured concrete patio and hired a local company to install it. I wanted it to resemble slate, and in turned out beautifully. Then my friend Tyler Wisler (he is amazing) and I worked together for about a month to come up with the overall design. We ordered the furniture and accessories and collected lots of plants and flowers. My dad and my husband built the cedar slat wall, Tyler and I arranged the furniture, and it was complete.

(Before, below.)

We spent so much time in this space (especially in the evening) last year, and I am thrilled and grateful to be able to do it again. Thanks for letting me share my excitement, friends!

ALSO FIND US HERE: INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Sometimes You Feel Like A Nut

I don’t know who made these for this dog, but I love them! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Question of Being Native Wildlife

feral horses

I make no bones about my view that the horses that roam the American West are feral and should not be regarded as native wildlife. This view shouldn’t controversial, but it is.

Lots of romanticism exist about horses and the West, including that brief time when Native cultures used horses as their greatest asset in hunting bison.

But the truth is that the horses one might see roaming the ranges of the American West are all derived from domestic horses that went wild on the range. The initial ones were all derived from Iberian/North African horses that Spanish colonizers brought into the New World, but these were later augmented with horses brought over from the rest of Europe.

If one were to say that the various forms of freely breeding swine in North America were feral, it would be easy to get agreement. Suids are not native to the Americas, though a sister lineage, the Tayassuidae, are native to North America. The tayassuids, better known as peccaries or javelinas, once ranged as far north as the Yukon, but since the Pleistocene, they have not ranged north of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona.  Feral swine, though, exist over large sections of the country, and wildlife and agricultural departments spend lots of time, money, and manpower on controlling their numbers.

Feral horses, though, get special privileges, as do feral donkeys.  They receive a certain amount of protection not afforded to other feral livestock in the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971. The horses and donkeys are not controlled in the same way feral pigs are. There is no continuous open season on them in the way that most states manage feral pigs.  Indeed, it is actually a crime to kill or harass feral horses or burros on federal land.  Excess horses and burros are managed through roundups, where some of them are deemed adoptable and sold to the general public.

For those of us with a modern ecological mindset, which has a deep disdain for making allowances for feral livestock, this law makes little sense.

But there is a sort of argument for this act. It goes something like this:

The modern horse species evolved in its current form in North America. Some taxonomists contend that there was once a Holarctic distribution of this species during the Pleistocene, and with the latest ancient DNA studies, I tend to agree with this assertion.

The North American population of horses became extirpated at the end of the Pleistocene, and when European horses went feral on the Western ranges, this constitutes a rewilding event.

Now, I don’t buy this argument very much, but I can say that there are some things we might consider. North America’s original population of cougars became extinct at the same time. The cougars that live in North America are derived from South American cougars that recolonized the continent about 2,000 years later.

Further, conservationists and sporting groups spend lots of resources on restoring and protecting elk populations. Elk have a much shorter history on this continent than horses ever did. Different experts have estimated when elk have first arrived. 40,000 years ago has been suggested, but more recent data points to them colonizing North America only 15, 200 years ago.

If elk arrived in North America only that recently, their status as native wildlife exists only as a weird  accident of geography. Elk are the on Cervinae or “plesiometacarpal deer” in the Americas. All the other deer in the Americas are Capreolinae or “telemetacarpal deer.”  Sika, axis, red deer, and fallow deer are also Cervinae, but they were introduced after colonization.

Elk don’t live in far northeast of Russia anymore. The elk of North America are the genetic legacy of this ghost population.

So the feral horse advocates could at least through the recent arrival of elk in North America as something to consider when we say their favorite animal is not native. Horses have a long evolutionary history in North America, and we just happen to be at an odd point of the history of horses that no native horses exist here. The earliest horse, Eohippus, first appeared in North America 52 million years ago.

So the feral horse advocates could say that we have a species that derived from a lineage that was here for over 50 million years that has now been restored through feral livestock and thus deserves these protections.  And this animal has at least as much rights to be free and roaming in North America as a large deer that had no connection to this continent until the latest Pleistocene.

However, the extinction of the horse in North America likely stemmed from natural climate change at the end of the Pleistocene.  Horses became extinct because they were poorly adapted to the new ecosystems, and as we have seen, horses really don’t do that well out in the deserts and semi-arid ranges of the West. They require water tanks to get them through long droughts, and they eat lots of forage. Not as much as domestic cattle, of course, but on ranges that are heavily catered toward livestock grazing, the horses are just an extra set of grazers that are taking away forage from native wildlife.

And even if we were to accept that horses were restored native wildlife, why on earth would we ever extend these protections to donkeys? Donkeys, though of ancient North American origin, evolved in their current form in Africa.

So although I do think of horses as no longer being native to North America, I do think questions of them being native or introduced are complicated, much more so than the question of feral pigs or cats. And yes, there is something like an argument that can be made for the native status of horses, even though I think it’s mostly in error.

Natural History

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

What is exactly is a turtle?

box turtle

Possibly the greatest debate in all vertebrate taxonomy is classifying the turtle. If you were to ask an expert about where turtles belong, well, it will depend upon the expert and which papers this expert has recently read.

That’s because the literature on turtles is definitely divided. Morphological comparison studies, some of which have used rather complex statistical analysis of characters, have generally placed them closer to Lepidosaurs.  The most common Lepidosaurs are squamates, which are better known as snakes and lizards, and there is another Lepidosaur order with exactly one species left in it. Rhynchocephalia is this order, and it includes exactly one extant species, the tuatara of New Zealand.

Molecular studies have generally placed the turtles either into or close to Archosaurs.  Extant Archosaurs are the crocodilians and birds. All dinosaurs and pterosaurs were also Archosaurs, and birds, which are the only living dinosaurs, are certainly Archosaurs.

One would think that molecular studies would solve this problem, but it really doesn’t.  The problem is that turtles evolve quite slowly, and trying to figure out divergence times based upon mutation rates could result in inaccurate conclusions.

So no one really has a way to resolve this conflict.

And if you were to ask me, I would say, well, I don’t know. We have some ideas, but they are in conflict. And we have no way to resolve them at this time.

But that’s science for ya.

 

 

Natural History

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Friday Funny: Who’s The Boss?

Happy weekend! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Happy National Kids and Pets Day!

Today’s the day to celebrate growing up with pets. Share your photos! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Friday Funny: Leave Me Alone!

Hang in there, it’s Friday! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Silver Screen to Mainstream: The Original Influencers

This post is in partnership with the Chicago History Museum.

Those of you who follow me on Instagram may have joined me last Friday as my mom, daughter, and I visited the most incredible exhibition at the Chicago History Museum entitled Silver Screen to Mainstream. When I first heard about it, I was intrigued by its tagline – “the original influencers” – and when I saw it in person and learned more about the history of the clothing on display, the tagline really made sense. Today I thought I’d share with you some pieces of the wonderful afternoon we spent at the exhibition. And I hope those of you in the Chicago area (and beyond!) will take the time to go check it out. It’s captivating.

Jessica Roussin, Digital Marketing Coordinator for Chicago History Museum (that’s her above!), gave us a little tour when we first arrived, and explained more behind the pieces in the exhibit. Over thirty garments from the 1930′s and 40′s are on display, by designers such as Chanel, Vionnet, Valentina, Paul du Pont, Howard Greer, and Adrian, and you guys, they are stunning. She also explained more about the history behind it, which was just fascinating to me.

If you’ve been reading here for a while, you likely know that I have a background in fashion (I majored in theatre in college and spent much of my senior year studying costume design, and later ran an eco-friendly womenswear label for close to 15 years), and the history of fashion in America during the 20th century has always had a place in my heart. I didn’t know a great deal about this particular era though, and walking through the exhibit was such a rich lesson in how, as America headed out of the Great Depression, celebrity culture emerged and began to affect mainstream style. Long before blogs and social media existed, Hollywood movie stars were true influencers, and for the first time in history, designers began creating garments for the everyday woman based on what these stars wore in their films and beyond.

While Silver Screen to Mainstream showcases fashions from Paris, New York, Chicago, and Hollywood, it was (understandably) the section featuring dresses that were all worn by Chicago women that most resonated with me. An evening dress made of silk and ostrich feathers, which was a copy of a design made by Jenkins Gowns for a performance by opera singer Helen Jepson, was custom made for the woman who ultimately donated it to the museum (Mrs. Otto Madlener) by Stanley Korshak Chicago, a high end women’s apparel store here in Chicago. The dress is absolutely jaw dropping in person. My daughter couldn’t take her eyes off it. It was so cool to be able to explain to her how old it was (she’s 5, so anything more than 10 years old is ancient in her eyes), the story behind it, and how it was created during a time when our country was truly reinventing itself after a decade of difficult times. (The exhibit also had a “cinema” that explained more about fashion of this era; my daughter watched the video five times.)

In addition to the plethora of glamorous dresses on display, the exhibition also has a section of casual dresses handmade by women who weren’t designers or famous on any level from patterns ordered from catalogs. One of the dresses is even on display inside out, to showcase the detail that was put into sewing it. Even these house dresses are simply gorgeous, and it was so cool to learn more about the time when sewing patterns first became commonplace.

It was also a treat to get to see the shoes, evening bags, and jewelry worn at the time, and the ways in which Hollywood had influence over accessories as well as clothing. I was specifically drawn to the dress clips on display, which were very on trend at the time. They were convertible, and could be worn on necklines, on shoes, or as brooches. My daughter was intrigued by the pocketbooks, which were quite fancy, and made from materials like suede, metal, and even plastic.

I took so much from this exhibition (as did my mom and daughter!), but I was especially intrigued by how, despite serious hardships and adversity as a result of the Great Depression, people in the 1930′s and 40′s used fashion to retain a sense of normalcy – or to at least appear to be together, even if the rest of their lives were not. Going to the movies was an escape from reality that provided a sense of optimism, and women were inspired by the fashion of the stars, so they took a little of the movies with them and made that fashion their own. Some were able to purchase designer replicas of what the actresses wore, and others (most, I’m guessing) purchased inexpensive patterns and created Hollywood inspired garments from them. Whatever the means, in a time of uncertainty, the fashion of the cinema was moving far beyond the silver screen and providing the mainstream with an exciting, new American style.

If you live in the Chicago area, or are planning a trip to Chicago, I highly recommend stopping by the Chicago History Museum and checking out Silver Screen to Mainstream (which runs through January 21, 2020) in person. It tells a fascinating story, and the hard work by Collection Manager Jessica Pushor and Guest Curator Virginia Heaven is evident. Then stay and explore the rest of the museum, which is full of fun for the entire family. Essley was obsessed with the lifestyle Chicago style hotdog. I was obsessed with the gorgeous event room (seen directly above).

For more information on Silver Screen to Mainstream, visit Chicago History Museum’s website.

ALSO FIND US HERE: INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

Posted in Pet Care And Pest Control Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment