Scared Street Dog Goes From Running In Fear To Snuggling, Gets Loving

Scared Street Dog Goes From Running In Fear To Snuggling, Gets Loving
It only took a few moments in the arms of a gentle human for this pup to go from frightened stray to lovable lap dog. Professor Einstein, as he's now called, was abandoned and in bad shape, roaming the streets of Los Angeles. Then, the renowned canine …
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Semi driver involved in toll road crash reunited with runaway dog
Semi driver involved in toll road crash reunited with runaway dog. Justin Luther and his dog Tia are usually inseparable, but the dog bolted when the semitrailer Luther drives was involved in an accident. Fortunately, a kind stranger and the Humane
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Jul 19, the raw food diet I am using for my huskies………

3 years ago I finally put it together that one of my dogs has an allergy to kibble ingredients. I was feeding the best kibble I could find; Wellness and
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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Shorty Rossi to Attend A Cause 4 Paws Fundraiser

Pit Boss star Shorty Rossi, who has helped to make great strides in promoting a positive image of dogs who are so often unjustly hounded by people’s prejudice, will attend a day of dogged…



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Brooklyn Flea Serves Up Specialty Ice Creams on National Ice Cream Day

Brooklyn Flea Serves Up Specialty Ice Creams on National Ice Cream Day
It's National Ice Cream Day, and vendors at Brooklyn Flea, which has served as the hub of specialty ice creams throughout the weekend, are offering the "Creme de la Creme." NY1's Tara Lynn Wagner filed the following report. Forget chocolate and vanilla.
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NCVMA: Controlling fleas
Once a flea infestation gets established in your home environment, it is tough to bring under control, because adult fleas produce thousands of offspring. The adult fleas you see on your pet are only 5 percent of the total flea problem. The other 95
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Does Complete and Balanced Pet Food Guarantee Good Health?

When a bag, can, or other container of pet food says complete and balanced, what does that mean?

 It simply means that the mix of ingredients in the pet food has enough of the nutrients needed in the diet to prevent most diseases due to deficiencies of proteins, fats, minerals, and vitamins. Diets are tested to ensure they have the right amount of chemical nutrients and minerals, but the lack of moisture and healthy oils or addition of allergens and too many calories can cause chronic medical problems When pets are fed the recommended amounts, many will become obese. Others may develop ear infections, skin infections, and diarrhea from allergenic ingredients in the food. Pet foods may make your dog get fat, or itch, shake, and develop the runs. There’s no way to guarantee a pet food is good for all pets. That’s the lesson I learned. I share this information with all my clients and try to spread the word through my blogs and books.

 Most dogs and cats seem to thrive on commercial pet food. However, individual dogs and cats may need a different type of diet to stay healthy, prevent disease, or treat medical issues.Some dogs or cats may need more oils for a dry coat, less carbohydrates to lose weight, a different meat or gluten-free diet for allergies (skin, ear, or bowel issues), more moisture (canned, homemade or raw) for the prevention or treatment of urinary crystals or stones, or holistic, homemade, or raw pet food for severe allergies, bowel issues or seizures. Most commercial dry food is geared for the average pet without health issues. These mixes of ingredients may not be healthy for a pet with allergies to wheat, obese pets, or those with urinary problems. Even raw food aficionados forget that not all dogs do well on a raw diet if they are fed a raw diet with beef or chicken, and the pet is allergic to a certain meat. The type of meat, the presence of grain or glutens, the amount of oils, and the percentage of moisture all can affect the health of your pet.

Where do you turn for advice? Can you ask your vet? Most veterinarians are trained to advise a different prescription diet for each medical issue. These diets may work, but may not be readily eaten by some pets. Some of the dry medical diets aren’t really much better for the pet’s health than most commercial foods. One urinary diet may help with crystals, but has wheat in it, that may cause skin problems. Prescription diets may be too expensive for some people and the pet suffers because they are offered no alternatives.

What are you supposed to do? Can you ask your vet about other types of diets that may work? How about homemade or a raw diet? Feeding canned food versus a kibble diet for weight loss? Feeding raw, meaty, bones to keep teeth clean? Most vets won’t know practical nutritional advice, because we were not trained to give it. Millions of pets are thriving on different diets, but most veterinarians are only trained to give advice on commercially “complete and balanced” diets and their prescription diets. Don’t blame your vet for not giving you alternatives like a homemade or raw diet or even simply supplementing your pet’s diet with healthy “human food”. We just weren’t trained to do that.

10 years ago, I started questioning the way we feed our pets. I had to reeducate myself and learn nutritional principles. I read 100’s of nutritional articles and labels on commercial food and raw food. I read books on feeding raw food and home cooking, as well as many books on human nutrition. As a result, I started advising my clients to feed different ingredients depending on their pets needs. For example, many purebred dogs and some cats need to avoid wheat-filled treats and food. Avoiding glutens in sensitive pets may cure ear problems, skin problems, bowel issues, and even seizures. With the success of nutritional counseling, I saw that different types of ingredients and moister food (canned, homemade, or raw), helped with weight problems or helped control medical problems like preventing urinary crystals from forming in both dogs and cats. I came to realize that our pets are individuals, and that each may need more than the common commercial kibble for optimum health. Some pets may need different ingredients in the dry food. Other pets may need to eat moister canned food, raw food, or home cooked food to be healthier, leaner, or to help with medical problems.

After my research and success, I wrote Dog Dish Diet: Sensible Nutrition for Your Dog’s Health in 2009. I updated a couple sections and published the second edition in 2011. Many clients wanted more slow cooking recipes that were in the book, so I published an eBook. Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet with slow cooking recipes and nutritional advice for both dogs and cats. There isn’t a day that goes by when a client or reader tells or emails me that they changed the type of food or the ingredients in the diet to help with a medical problem. I am so happy to know that I have truly helped pet owners become part of the health care team to treat or prevent chronic medical problems.

I’m convinced that the right mix of ingredients may often prevent most problems or the need for medication. If you want to treat or prevent medical problems in your pet, check out my blogs, you tube videos (http://youtube.com/drgregdvm), and my books, Dog Dish Diet and Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet .

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Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

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Incredibly Touching Story Of A Dog’s Last Day On Earth

An amazingly beautiful and heartfelt story of a dog named Duke Roberts and his last day on earth. All photos and accompanying text with kind permission by photographer Robyn Arouty

The post Incredibly Touching Story Of A Dog’s Last Day On Earth appeared first on A Place to Love Dogs.

A Place to Love Dogs

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Kako konturisati lice (FULL)

Hvala za gledanje!
Video Rating: 4 / 5

VE AKP ZİHNİYETİ BAYRAĞI İNDİRTTİ / TERÖRİSTLERLE MASAYA OTURMANIN BEDELLERİ AĞIR OLUR.

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Our Trip to Canyon of the Eagles

We’ve done a LOT of book signings through the years at a wide variety of venues: bookstores, festivals, trade shows, expos, newcomers’ clubs, you name it. But this past weekend we had the…



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Where does your money go when you support animal rights groups?

So while the American farmer works countless hours to produce food for a hungry world, two multimillion dollar organizations make their livings sitting at desks producing words asking for public donations. And they don’t seem to care much about facts or misleading the public. The two largest, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), are headquartered in high rent offices in Washington,…
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Police Abusing Dogs Is Connected to Police Abusing People

Whether you’re counting human bodies, dogs, or both, one thing is depressingly clear if you read Internet news on a daily basis: There are far too many cops in this country who shoot first and ask questions later. If you’re a regular reader of Dogster, you’ll see that I’ve written a lot of articles about police shooting dogs for virtually no reason. In one of the most recent cases, a Chicago police officer came to the home of Nichole Echlin. When the family dog, Apollo, bared his teeth, the officer fired one shot, killing him instantly.

“He just said it had to be done. He walked up to me, told me that and walked away,” Echlin told ABC News.

The case of Apollo was unique in one sense: The cop was fired almost instantly. He killed the dog on Friday and was jobless on Monday. That’s remarkable, and I wish I could write that more often.

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Police and demonstration by Shutterstock.

But the problem isn't just that police officers are bad with dogs. During my morning browses for news stories, I invariably come across stories about police brutality, law enforcement officers beating or killing people for no reason at all. Most often, they are people of color, or poor, or both. Just this week, two EMTs in New York had to stop four cops from beating a patient who was handcuffed to a stretcher. Last month, police in Brooklyn dragged a 48-year-old woman out of her apartment who wore nothing but her underwear and a towel, making her pass out from an asthma attack. In June, a San Mateo sheriff's deputy shot and killed Yanira Serrano Garcia, an 18-year-old  with special needs, when her own family called 911 for medical assistance. In Ohio this week, a young man was gunned down by police when he picked up a toy gun while shopping in a WalMart. And of course, Eric Garner's choking death at the hands of New York police officers has drawn national attention.

On and on and on. The depressing thing is that I can never chronicle the number of abuses, either of dogs or people, in any but the most superficial way. Earlier this week, Gawker printed a roundtable discussion on the subject called "It's Time We Treat Police Brutality as a National Crisis." Reason Magazine posted an op-ed with a similar title: "It's Time For Cops to Stop Shooting Dogs." Both are long overdue, and we also need to consider how police abuse of dogs and humans is connected.

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Eric Garner's Funeral a katz / Shutterstock.com

Reporter Radley Balko, who has covered many dog-shooting incidents in his own blog, has also reported extensively on the increasing militarization of police departments, and how it leads to more violent responses. In an excerpt from his book, Rise of the Warrior Cop, published on Salon.com, Balko quotes former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper on the phenomenon of dog shootings:

But Stamper says that like many aspects of modern policing, dog shootings may have had a legitimate origin, but the practice has since become a symptom of the mind-set behind a militarized police culture. "Among other things, it really shows a lack of imagination. These guys think that the only solution to a dog that's yapping or charging is shooting and killing it. That's all they know. It goes with this notion that police officers have to control every situation, to control all the variables. That's an awesome responsibility, and if you take it on, you're caving to delusion. You no longer exercise discrimination or discretion. You have to control, and the way you control is with authority, power, and force. With a dog, the easiest way to take control is to simply kill it. I mean, especially if there are no consequences for doing so."

For the past 40 years (at least) there has been an escalation in politicians, news media, and law-enforcement officials talking about law enforcement in terms of fighting a war, with police officers as the soldiers. That rhetoric is borne out in the equipment issued to police and the tactics they use on the street. Since SWAT teams were developed by the Los Angeles Police Department in the late 1960s, the squads have become a nationwide phenomenon, and deployment has gone from being a rarity for extreme circumstances to standard operating procedure. The War on Drugs and the War on Terror are part of our everyday vocabulary.

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Injured Dog by Shutterstock.

We have to ask ourselves, though, if cops are fighting a war, who is the enemy? Who are they fighting? All too often, it turns out to be us, the people that they are supposed to protect and serve. The enemy is anyone who isn't a cop or who won't instantly cooperate with them, whether that's Apollo the dog or a middle-aged black woman in her underwear. As Stamper's quote underscores, the consequences for such actions are minimal, and so it happens again and again.

I don't want police to go out thinking that they're at war. That puts every one of us in danger. I'm all for police officers having guns and electric-shock devices and clubs, but they should be last resorts, not the first. In the Gawker article, I like community organizer Ruby-Beth Buitekant's idea for reforming our system of law enforcement best:

Can we imagine, for a minute, what it would look like if officers were trained in mediation? What if you called the police when you witnessed a violent fight; officers arrived ready to separate the parties, come to a nonviolent resolution, and make sure each person got home safely.

I might never see that, but if it were to happen, I believe a lot fewer people and animals would die.

Via Gawker, Reason, and Salon

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